Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture Beijing, China.

Day 2 :

  • Track 2: Horticulture, Floriculture & Forestry
    Track 6: Crop Protection and Management
    Track 7: Spices, Herbs and Medicinal Plants
    Track 8: Tissue Culture and Plant Biotechnology
    Track 9: Agricultural Engineering and Technology
Speaker

Chair

Andy Renz

Benson Hill Biosystems Inc.
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Fhatuwani Mudau N

University of South Africa
South Africa

Session Introduction

Surendra Dara

University of California Cooperative Extension
USA

Title: Entomopathogenic fungi as holistic tools in crop production and protection
Speaker
Biography:

Surendra Dara obtained his PhD in Entomology from Virginia Tech. He specializes in entomopathology and focuses his research on providing IPM solutions for strawberries, vegetables and other crops in California. He authored or co-authored more than 200 publications that include extension articles, journal articles, book chapters and manuals. He holds offices at the Society of Invertebrate Pathology and Entomological Society of America Pacific Branch. He is the Vice-Chair of National Working Group on Microbial Control of Arthropod Pests, Chair of the Strawberry Work Group and a Member of the Sustainable Food Systems Strategic Initiative at University of California.

Abstract:

Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium brunneum and Isaria fumosorosea are traditionally used in crop protection to manage arthropod pests. However, recent studies show that their interaction with plants as mycorrhizae and endophytes allows them to play a bigger role in crop production. Improved plant growth, plant health, biomass and protection from plant diseases are additional contributions of entomopathogenic fungi. Entomopathogenic fungi might also help with conservation of nutrients and moisture through improved absorption. Understanding the plant-entomopathogen-arthropod interactions and exploring their potential for overall plant health contributes to sustainable pest management.

Andy Renz

Benson Hill Biosystems Inc.
USA

Title: Increased crop yield through improved photosynthesis
Speaker
Biography:

Andy Renz received his PhD in Plant Molecular Biology from the University of Bayreuth, Germany. After Postdoctoral studies at the Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam, Germany, he joined BASF Plant Science in 1999 as Lab Leader for Metabolic Engineering of Oilseed Crops. From 2003 to 2014 he was leading international teams at BASF Plant Science and was responsible for numerous technology acquisitions in Europe, Asia and the Americas. In 2014 he joined Benson Hill Biosystems as Vice President Business Development. He is on the Industry Advisory Board of several organizations including Ag Innovation Showcase and Global Ag Investing.

Abstract:

Benson Hill Biosystems, The Photosynthesis Company™ established a unique platform for the discovery and validation of approaches to increase photosynthetic efficiency and ultimately crop yield. Based on a deep knowledge of photosynthesis, state-of-the-art transcriptomics and proprietary computational biology databases and algorithms, candidate genes have been identified to improve the photosynthetic machinery of plants. We established unique model systems for crops with C3 and C4-photosynthesis for a fast and systematic validation of candidate genes in planta. Lead genes have been identified that when over-expressed under the control of developmentally regulated promoters lead to a significantly increased photosynthesis rate, plant growth, biomass production and seed yield in model plants. Promising lead genes have been transformed into several crops and their performance has been confirmed in field trials. We will present our discovery and validation platform and will discuss results from the over-expression of our most promising lead genes in model plants and crops. Benson Hill Biosystems already established commercial partnerships with market leaders: For potato we collaborate with Simplot for sugarcane in Brazil with Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira (CTC) for corn and wheat with Limagrain. We are actively seeking for new partnerships with seed companies in Asia that are interested to work with us in crops such as corn, rice, sugarcane, soybean, cotton and trees to increase crop yield through improved photosynthesis.

Bolla Joseph

Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University
India

Title: Climate smart cropping systems
Speaker
Biography:

Bolla Joseph is currently working as the Professor and Head of the Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, India

Abstract:

The name agriculture becomes imbalance weigher when all well management cropping practices are always lighter than evergreen climate change and in order to balance between these two handles of world food supply chain population explosion needs well managed cropping practice is needed which will fit and sustain in extremes of future climate change. Agriculture production system should be cheap, adaptive, development oriented, high mitigation controllable and meet the demands of increasing food in sustainable ways to become it as climate-smart. A climate smart agriculture is interaction of climate effect and community adaptability, with well research and micro level interactive understanding allows to design, execute the climate-smart agricultural practices. Improvements in the management of agricultural systems bring us significantly closer to safe operating spaces will require transformations in governance and use of our natural resources, underpinned by enabling political, social and economic conditions beyond incremental changes. Establishing scientifically credible indicators and metrics of long-term safe operating spaces in the context of a changing climate and growing social-ecological challenges is critical to creating the societal demand and political will is required to motivate the deep transformation for innovative and transitional changes. A collective and collaborative wok spheres is needed in ecological management, social, integration of data analysis and framework of national and international policy to facilitate decision making informed by metrics and indicators of safe operating spaces.

Speaker
Biography:

Fhatuwani Mudau N is currently working as Professor at University of South Africa, South Africa.

Abstract:

Baby spinach is a relatively a new crop in South Africa which has a commercially significant and is reputed to have health attributes such as protection against degenerative diseases of ageing, such as heart disease, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cataracts and several forms of cancer. Three parallel NPK trials to investigate the response of baby spinach vegetable to Nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) on growth and development were conducted. N and P treatments were arranged as follows 0, 45, 75, 105, 120 kg∙ha-1 N and P and K treatments arranged as 0, 63, 85, 127, 148 kg∙ha-1 arranged in a randomised complete block designed with four replicates. Results showed that yield, dry matter, chlorophyll content, leaf area index were significantly increased by increasing N application, while K had no significance and effect on the yield, dry matter, chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance except on the leaf area index. Nitrogen treatments quadratically increased fresh yield, dry matter and chlorophyll content reaching maximum at 75 Kg N ha -1. Phosphorus application showed a significance yields, dry matter as well as chlorophyll content reaching maximum at 75 kg P ha-1. Therefore, to achieve optimum growth for N and P, 75 kg∙ha-1 N or P is recommended. The NPK combined trial arranged as 0, 30: 30: 40, 45:45:60, 60:60:70, 75:75:90 kg∙ha-1 arranged in a randomised complete block design with three replicates.The results showed that high yields, chlorophyll content, fresh and dry matter reached maximum where NPK combined was applied at 45:45:60kg∙ha-1.

A Madhavi Lata

Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University
India

Title: Studies on Amla and Terminalia based agri-horticultural system intercropped with Aswagandha
Speaker
Biography:

A Madhavi Lata completed her PhD (Agronomy) in 2011 from Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University and is working as Associate Professor in Department of Farm Forestry at College of Agriculture, Prof. Jayashanker Telangana State Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad. She is guiding both under graduate and post graduate students through teaching and research. She has attended a number of International and National conferences and presented papers on medicinal plants.

Abstract:

An experiment was conducted during kharif seasons of 2008-09 and 2009-10 at AICRP on Agroforestry, PJTSAU, Rajendrangar. The present investigation comprised of agroforestry model with aswagandha intercropped in four year old amla and terminalia agri-horticultural systems laid in split plot design with three replications.The treatments in aswagandha based agri-horticultural systems consisted of three cropping situations as main plots viz., intercropping of aswagandha in amla, intercropping of aswagandha in terminalia and sole cropping of aswagandha.
The results indicated that among the different cropping situations studied in aswagandha based agri-horticultural system; growth parameters like plant height, dry matter production and leaf area per plant of aswagandha were markedly higher under sole cropping situation when compared to intercropping situation both in amla and terminalia. Days to physiological maturity of aswagandha was delayed by 9-10 days in intercropping situation in terminalia when compared to intercropping in amla. Root and seed yields (kg ha-1) of aswagandha were the highest with sole cropping situation compared to either of the intercropping situations. Aswagandha performed better to some extent as an intercrop in amla as compared in terminalia. With an olide content (%) was significantly more under sole cropping. PAR was more under sole cropping compared to intercropping situation.

Speaker
Biography:

Alkhader has completed his PhD (in Horticulture and Crop Science) at the age of 49 years from University of Jordan. His MSc in Soils and Irrigation was also from the same university. He is working as a researcher in National Center for Agricultural Research And Extension (NCARE) in crop water and nutrient management. He is also the coordinator of the National Fertigation Project. He has published 4 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a member of fertilizer committee in his country (Jordan).

Abstract:

A survey was conducted to investigate the contamination of soils, plants and irrigation water with Cd, Pb and As heavy metals. Thirteen farms located from three locations characterized by intensive agricultural activities in Jordan (The Jordan Valley, Alyadoda, and Jarash) were selected for this purpose. Soil, plant and irrigation water samples were collected for chemical analysis: mainly heavy metals and P contents. The soil samples were collected from the 0-20 cm depth and the plant samples were collected from the available grown vegetables in the selected farms.
The tolerable level of Cd in fruit vegetables of 0.05 mg kg-1 fresh weight was approached by cucumber plant from farm no. 4 (0.06 ppm), tomato plant (0.06 -0.07 ppm), and exceeded by hot pepper (0.14 ppm). On the other hand, the permissible concentration of Pb in fruit vegetables of 0.1 mg kg-1 fresh weight was surpassed by tomato plants (0.24 -0.77 ppm); sweet pepper (0.14 ppm); cucumber plants (0.28-0.40 ppm) and hot pepper (0.88 ppm). Also, red cabbage 9 had Pb content (0.97 ppm) higher than the accepted level of 0.3 mg kg-1 of fresh weight for brassica vegetables. However, lettuce iceberg plants are within allowable levels of Cd and Pb of 0.2 and 0.3 mg kg-1 of fresh weight, respectively, for leafy vegetables. While, the Cd concentration in these lettuce plants ranged from 0.03 to 0.05 ppm (on fresh weight basis), the Pb concentration varied from 0.12 to 0.25 ppm (on fresh weight basis). All selected crops are safe with respect to As content as their contents of this heavy metal are much less than the established acceptable concentration of 1 mg kg-1 fresh weight.
The results suggest that the most probable sources of the heavy metals (Cd, Pb and As) in the collected samples from soils and crops from the selected farms are soil parent materials and pesticides application. However, P fertilizers additions for long time period might also contribute to the heavy metals contents of the plants and escalate the problem. Polluted air, also, represents a potential source for the heavy metals in the plants.
Chemical analysis of the irrigation water used in the selected farms suggest that such water can’t be considered as probable sources of heavy metals in the investigated soils from the selected farms. The levels of heavy metals in some selected fertilizers used by farmers in Jordan are, also, regarded below the permissible limits, but still likely sources of heavy metals in agricultural soils in under long-term application of such P fertilizers.

Speaker
Biography:

Maclin Dayod is currently the Head of Crop Breeding and Miscellaneous Crops Section in the Research Division of the Department of Agriculture Sarawak, Malaysia. Since 2012, his research work focuses on breeding for good eating quality in Oryza sativa L and varietal improvement in Solanum lasiocarpum Dunal. He is also responsible for the conservation and propagation of various crops which include pepper and other spices, herbs and medicinal plants. He also had researched on the impact of calcium on plant water channels (aquaporins) and uptake for his PhD and the physiological changes in barley due to water logging for his Master's degree.

Abstract:

Terung Asam Sarawak (Solanum lasiocarpum Dunal) is a unique indigenous fruit vegetable in Sarawak. A recent product development work by researchers in the Department of Agriculture Sarawak showed that the fruit can be processed into various products such as juice, jam, puree and dehydrated slices. These products provide opportunities for commercialization of the crop. However, the crop is very susceptible to many soil-borne pathogens in particular bacterial wilt and phytopthora. This problem hampers the big scale planting of the crop. Hence, grafting work was initiated to mitigate the problem. Six to eight-leaves plants were used for grafting and wedge and saddle methods were compared. Initial studies showed promising graft compatibility between Solanum lasiocarpum as scion and Solanum torvum as rootstock. Yield of grafted plants were between 1.5 and 3.2 kg/plant which is comparable to the non-grafted plants. Saddle technique looks more promising than the wedge technique. Field performances of the grafted plants are being monitored and their fruit nutritional contents will be analyzed.

Speaker
Biography:

Ningthoujam Shovarani is working as Research Scientist at Indian Council of Agricultural Research, India.

Abstract:

Tomato is one of the main items in daily food we eat. Off-season production of tomato is widely accepted by the farmers in Manipur for higher returns because of the ideal soil and climatic conditions for cultivation of vegetable. Like other states of India it is seriously affected by pest attack. To reduce damage and increase in yield for commercial purpose farmers in Manipur generally use various pesticides. The investigations were carried out during the month of Sept 2014 to April 2015. The aim of present study is to identify the commonly used pesticides on tomato and to study the attitudes and practices developed by vegetable growers about pesticide applications. Questionnaires which include socio-professional factors, provisions and operations concerning the use of varieties of pesticides were addressed to vegetable growers in various vegetable farms. In order to complete the data regarding the commonly used pesticides on tomatoes in Bishnupur District various vegetable growers were cross-examined and information were also collected from various agrochemical agents and Farm Science Centre, Utlou. The survey showed that farmers have an acceptable knowledge to exploit instructions concerning the pesticide use but majority of them do not use the recommended tools. Most of them did not received training on pesticide used and no recommendation from agriculture expert. They used pesticides only after consulting with the agrochemical dealers. None of the vegetable growers usually wear goggles while handling and spraying of pesticides, very few wear gloves and maximum of them wear oro-nasal mask. Failure to observe minimum intervals between pesticide application and sale is worrying because toxic (Mancozeb, Carbofuran, Bipyridyl) and moderately toxic (Cypermethrin, Imidacloprid, Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos, Propineb, Dichlorvos) are the products currently used in Bishnupur District. The present investigation indicates that pesticide application in Bishnupur District represents a possible risk for the environment, farmers and consumers. Research studies are very much needed to measure pesticide residues on tomatoes currently consumed in Manipur. Survey on pesticide applications in other districts of Manipur are also necessary and moreover to determine the potential effect of those products on human and animal health.

Speaker
Biography:

Bukola Aminu-Taiwo is working as Research Scientist at National Horticultural Research Institute, Nigeria.

Abstract:

The use of botanical extracts for controlling plant parasitic nematodes is becoming more popular because of the problem of environmental pollution arising from the use of persistent pesticides. Some nematicides have been banned, yet the farmers still use them. This poses danger to human, the environment, beneficial microbes in the soil as well as underground body water. This emphasizes the need for new methods of control such as the use of environmentally-friendly plant extracts. Therefore, effects of water extracts of leaves of Tagetes erecta (Marigold), Tithonia diversifolia (Mexican sunflower), Chromolaena odorata (Siam weed) and Occimum gratissimun (Tree basil) each at 3.3, 5.0, 6,6, 8.3 and 10% w/v, on eggs and second stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita were investigated in vitro. The efficacy of dry milled leaves of these plants at 1 t/ha and 2 t/ha and carbofuran at 1.5kg a.i./ha and 2.5kg a.i./ha were also evaluated against M. incognita in a screen house.
Fifty M. incognita eggs per 1ml in water suspension were pipette and dispensed into glass blocks and 1ml of each extract at different concentrations were added. Fifty freshly hatched juveniles per 1ml were also dispensed into a glass blocks and 1 ml of each plant extracts at different concentrations were also added. Distilled water served as control. Hatched eggs were counted every 24 hours for 10 days while juveniles were observed for mortality every 24 hours for five days. In the screen house, 48 pots were filled with sterilized soil. Treatments were carbofuran (1.5 and 2.5 kg a.i./ha), milled dried leaves of marigold, siam weed, mexican sunflower and tree basil at 1t/ha and 2t/ha each and untreated control. Two days later four seeds of cucumber were sown in each of the 48 pots. One week after germination, the seedlings were each inoculated with 10,000 M incognita eggs. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomised designed with four replicates. Data were collected on Vegetative Growth (VG), Gall Index (GI), nematode reproduction and yield (g). LC50 was also determined. All data were analysed using ANOVA (p=0.05) and means were separated using Duncan multiple range test at 5% probability. Water extracts of T. erecta inhibited egg hatch by 90.5% at the highest concentration and was significantly higher than egg hatch observed in O. gratissimum which produced the lowest egg hatch inhibition of 70.7%. T. erecta also caused 100% juvenile mortality within 24 hours of exposure followed by T. diversifolia (59%), C. odorata (50%) and O. gratissimum 26.5% at the lowest concentration. Targetes erecta extract was the most potent among the plant extracts used with LC 50 of 0.31mg/ml-1. In the pot experiment, T. erecta, C. odorata, Carbofuran and O. gratissimun reduced GI by 62.5%, 65%, 75% and 75.5%, respectively. Similarly, RKN population was reduced by 85.4% in T. erecta-treated pots; C. odorata caused 87.6% reduction and Carbofuran 93.1%. The results of this study suggest that application of these plants as botanical pesticides in the management of RKN is highly promising, especially as they are readily available in Nigeria.

Speaker
Biography:

Ambani Richardo Mudau is on the final phase of his Masters degree at the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa.

Abstract:

Baby spinach (Spinacia oleracea L) is a member of the Amaranthaceae family. Its leaves have a very high respiration rate thus post-harvest quality is affected mostly by tissue decay and the development of off-odours. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage temperature and time on the post-harvest quality of baby spinach. Baby spinach leaves were harvested at 36 days after planting and subsequently stored at 4˚ C or 22˚ C for 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 days. Thereafter the leaves were incubated for 72 hours at 40˚ C to dry. Minerals, trace elements, total phenols, total carotenoids, flavonoids and antioxidant activities were measured. Composition of magnesium, zinc and iron declined after 8 days of storage at 4˚ C whilst at 22˚ C, they declined after 2 days of storage. Magnesium, zinc and iron revealed a similar trend with significantly higher carotenoids found up to 6 days in storage at 4˚ C whilst at 22˚ C the carotenoid levels declined after only 2 days. Total phenolic compounds gradually decreased in samples stored at 4˚ C. However, samples stored at 22˚ C showed a rapid decrease after 4 days. Both total antioxidant activities and Vitamin C content showed a similar trend with the content remaining constant at 4˚ C and decreasing after 6 days, whereas the total antioxidant activities and vitamin C for leaves stored at 22˚ C decreased immediately after 2 days. However, storage time and temperature did not exhibit significant effects on selenium. Results demonstrated that quality of baby spinach deteriorates as storage time and temperature increase.

Speaker
Biography:

S Chandrashekhar is working as Associate Professor at College of Sericulture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru and is involved in Teaching, Research and Extension activities since seventeen years. He organized and participated in many national and international conferences, workshops etc. and published more than 50 scientific publications including research articles, books etc. He is recipient of many State and University awards and served as PI and Co-PI for externally funded projects. He also served as NSS Programme Officer since 9 years and organized health camps, social environmental and national integration camps for the benefit of students and farming community.

Abstract:

The foliar constituents of castor genotypes viz., major and secondary nutrients had marginal influence on growth indices showing positive trend with respect to improvement in the performance of eri silkworm. Major nutrient like nitrogen and secondary nutrient like calcium had significant relationship with growth indices, while the growth indices were non-significant with other major (phosphorus and potassium) and secondary nutrients (magnesium and sulphur). The growth indices viz., silk index (r=0.7707), oviposition index (r=0.7263), leaf – silk conversion rate (r=0.7096), growth index by per cent pupation (r=0.7281) and net reproductive rate (r=0.7386) with nitrogen content of castor leaves showed significant positive relationship among them. Further, calcium content was found to have significantly positive correlation with larval weight index (r=0.8969), cocoon weight index (r=0.9548), silk index (r=0.9688), eclosion index (r=0.8936), oviposition index (r=0.9425), leaf-cocoon ratio (r=0.8408), leaf - egg ratio (r=0.8672), leaf – cocoon conversion rate (r=0.8521), leaf – silk conversion rate (r=0.9323), growth index by per cent pupation (r=0.9815), growth index by per cent moth emergence (r= 0.9609) and net reproductive rate (r=0.9492), while the trend was reverse with larval duration index (r=-0.9405), pupal duration index (r=-0.9293) and larval -pupal duration index (r=-0.9579).