Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture Beijing, China.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Andy Renz

Benson Hill Biosystems Inc.
USA

Keynote: Trends in AgBiotech

Time : 10:05 - 10:30

OMICS International Agri-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Andy Renz photo
Biography:

Andy Renz received his PhD in Plant Molecular Biology from the University of Bayreuth, Germany. After Postdoctoral studies at the Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam, Germany, he joined BASF Plant Science in 1999 as Lab Leader for Metabolic Engineering of Oilseed Crops. From 2003 to 2014 he was leading international teams at BASF Plant Science and was responsible for numerous technology acquisitions in Europe, Asia and the Americas. In 2014 he joined Benson Hill Biosystems as Vice President Business Development. He is on the Industry Advisory Board of several organizations including Ag Innovation Showcase and Global Ag Investing.

Abstract:

Agricultural Biotechnology is far more than herbicide tolerant or insect resistant crops, although these two are key traits with multiple products in the market today. Driven by the realization that agricultural productivity will not suffice to feed the growing world population, and enabled by break-through advancements in genome sequencing and synthetic biology, new product concepts, approaches and traits have been developed. Disease resistant crops can now be developed through novel molecular breeding technologies such as genomic selection, and through transgenic approaches. Biologicals add a completely new dimension to the field of disease resistance in crops. Yield-enhanced crops and crops with improved abiotic stress tolerance are being developed by multi-nationals and start-up companies. To successfully develop products for this complex trait, a combination of molecular breeding, omics, synthetic biology, advanced phenotyping and precision agriculture is necessary. Biologicals have been developed that show promising effects on crop productivity in the field. The development of quality-improved crops has been challenging, and it now facilitated by progress in synthetic biology and genome editing. Future trends in AgBiotech may include integrated solutions of today’s AgBiotech approaches. In the biologicals field, these may include integrated products for improved crop-microbiome interactions and combinations of biologicals with agrochemical products. For yield-enhanced and stress tolerant crops these may be multi-gene stacks with precise genomic integration through genome editing, in combination with modern breeding-derived traits. Both, GM and non-GM products may be possible.

Keynote Forum

Ming Xu

Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Keynote: The optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration for the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum)

Time : 10:30-10:55

OMICS International Agri-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ming Xu photo
Biography:

Ming Xu has completed his PhD in 2000 from the University of California at Berkeley and Postdoctoral studies from the same university in 2002. He is an Associate Professor at Rutgers University and an Adjunct Professor with the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research has focused on global change ecology and process-based ecosystem modeling. He has published more than 100peer-reviewed papers in the leading journals of his fields and dozens of books and book chapters. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Plant Ecology.

Abstract:

This study examined the threshold of CO2 fertilization effect on the growth of winter wheat with five growth chambers where the CO2 concentration was controlled at 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200ppm respectively. I found that initial increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration dramatically enhanced winter wheat growth through the CO2 fertilization effect. However, this CO2 fertilization effect was substantially compromised with further increase in CO2 concentration, demonstrating a threshold (the optimal CO2 concentration) of 889.6, 909.4, and 894.2ppm for aboveground, belowground, and total biomass, respectively, and 967.8ppm for leaf photosynthesis. Also, high CO2 concentrations exceeding the threshold not only reduced leaf stomatal density, length and conductance, but also changed the spatial distribution pattern of stomata on leaves. The spatial patterns of stomata were scale-dependent, a pattern of regularity at scales below about 150 micrometers, clustering beyond 220 micrometers, and random between the two scales. Elevating CO2 concentration led to more regular patterns of stomatal distribution at small scales (<150 micrometer), but little effect was detected on the clustering patterns at large scales (>220 micrometers). In addition, high CO2 concentration also decreased the maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and the maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) of leaf photosynthesis. However, the high CO2 concentration had little effect on leaf length and plant height. The results indicate that climate change assessment models may overestimate the CO2 fertilization effect and, thus underestimate the potential threats of climate change on agriculture when atmospheric CO2 concentration exceeds the threshold. The threshold of CO2 fertilization effect found in this study can also be used as an indicator in selecting and breeding new wheat strains in adapting to future high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change.

OMICS International Agri-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bernard Omodei photo
Biography:

Bernie Omodei completed his PhD in Numerical Analysis age 26 years from Australian National University and postdoctoral studies at University of Manchester and Flinders University of South Australia. After lecturing at University of Sydney for seven years, he was Mail Order Manager at Oxfam Australia for 10 years. Prior to embarking on a career as an inventor, he was Fundraising Manager at Trees For Life. As well as his publications in mathematics, he recently published a paper on measured irrigation in Irrigation Science. He attended the 2015 International Symposium and “Writeshop” on Rainwater Harvesting in Addis Ababa.

Abstract:

The current paradigm for controlling the volume of water delivered to each plant is to control both the flow rate and the duration of the irrigation event. Measured irrigation is a radical departure from this paradigm and the implications for water-efficiency and energy-efficiency are significant. Measured irrigation is the implementation of two fundamental concepts: (i) Measured irrigation controls the application rate to each plant by controlling emitted volumes directly without the need to control the flow rate or the duration of the irrigation event. (ii) Variations in the application rate to each plant throughout the year are controlled by the prevailing weather conditions; the application rate is proportional to the nett evaporation rate (evaporation minus rainfall). Conventional irrigation systems use a timer or controller to control the opening and closing of solenoids in order to control the duration of the irrigation event and the frequency of irrigation. Measured irrigation uses an evaporator and level sensor to control the duration of the irrigation event and the frequency of irrigation. During the irrigation event water slowly drips into the evaporator from a control nozzle. Some applications of measured irrigation are discussed including the amount of water saved.

  • Track 1: Agronomy and Soil Sciences
    Track 4: Plant Biochemistry and Physiology
    Track 5: Crop Breeding and Genetics
    Track 13: Modeling tools in Agriculture DSS
Speaker

Chair

Nasir S A Malik

US Department of Agriculture
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Abdul Khalil Gardezi

Postgraduate College
Mexico

Speaker
Biography:

Abdul Khalil Gardezi is a distinguished Scientist and Academic Member of the Hydro Science Center, Postgraduate College in Agriculture Science in Mexico since 1981. He has received distinctions for teaching, research and service from 1988 until 2014. He has been selected for the originality of his research, presented as the best paper and oral presentation during 2003, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 in international congresses in Australia, Canada, England, Mexico and USA. He has published more than 170 papers national and internationally. He has been honored among 2000 outstanding intellectuals of the 21st century by the International Biographical Center Cambridge, England.

Abstract:

Most cactus pear farmers use manure as fertilizer. This practice provokes problems. The use of endomycorrhiza is almost unknown by such farmers. The objective of this work was to study the effect of organic matter and endomycorrhiza on cactus pear (Opuntia albicarpa) growth in two soil types under greenhouse conditions. There were differences (p≤0.05) in all the variables recorded due to the inoculation with Glomus intraradices and in most for the application of organic matter. Mycorrhiza and organic matter as vermicompost promoted higher stem and root growth. Overall, based on cactus pear vegetative growth, the application of 50 t ha-1 of vermicompost can be considered as the best alternative. The soil type did not affect plant growth. Mycorrhiza can be useful to improve mineral nutrition. These fungi can increase yields and reduce cost of production in cactus pear plantations. Vermicompost is a better alternative to apply organic matter in this crop.

Speaker
Biography:

Ruizong Jia had done his PhD from China Agricultural University (2003-2009), Post Doctorate from University of Hawaii (2009-2010), Hawaii Agriculture Research Center (2010-2013). Currently he is Associate Researcher and Associate Professor in Institute of Tropical Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture Sciences (2013- present).

Abstract:

Mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely used for specific, sensitive, and rapid analysis of proteins and has shown a high potential for bacterial identification and characterization. In the present study, four well-characterized rhizobia strains and E. coli DH5α, as a reference, were chosen to optimize applications of MALDI TOF MS for rhizobia species identification. The four rhizobia strains were Sinorhizobium/Ensifer meliloti USDA 1002T, Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370T, Mesorhziobium tianshanense USDA 3306T, and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense CCBAU 10071T. Bacterial cultivation, colony storage conditions and sampling time were studied to evaluate the effects on protein mass spectra. In comparison with 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree, the optimized method was further evaluated with 75 rhizobial strains of 40 characterized species in 4 genera (6 Mesorhziobium spp., 22 strains; 9 Rhizobium spp., 49 strains; 3 Sinorhizobium/Ensifer spp., 3 strains; and 1 Azorhizobium sp., 1 strain). The potential of developing a mass spectrum database for rhizobial species determination was demonstrated with blind samples. A dendrogram of 75 rhizobial strains of 4 genera was constructed based on MALDI-TOF mass spectra and the topological patterns agreed well with those in the 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree. The potential of developing a mass spectrum database for all rhizobia species was assessed with blind samples. The entire process from sample preparation to accurate species identification and classification required approximately 1 hour.

Speaker
Biography:

C Sudha Rani has completed her PhD at the age of 31 years from Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Andhra Pradesh, India. She is working as Professor (Agronomy) and Head of Agricultural Research Station, Tandur, Ranga Reddy District, Telangana State. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Field experiments were conducted during Kharif (2011-12 and 2012-13) on transplanted red gram (Cajanus cajan) with four spacings and five varieties in Vertisols (Black-cotton soils) at Agricultural Research Station, Tandur, Ranga Reddy District, Telangana state, India. The experiment was conducted in split plot design with spacings (4 No.) in the main plot (S1: 90×60 cm, S2: 120×90 cm, S3: 150×120 cm and S4: 180×120 cm) and with varieties (5 No.) in the sub-plot (V1: Asha, V2: PRG-158, V3: Maruthi, V4: Laxmi and V5: MRG-1004). Results of the pooled analysis (two years) of the trial revealed that growing of red gram at 90×60 cm (S1) recorded the highest seed yield (3532 Kg/ha) but it is on par with transplanting at 120×90 cm i.e. S2 (3193 Kg/ha). The S2 treatment has registered the highest benefit cost ratio because of it low cost of cultivation as the population of S2 is nearly half of the population of S1. On par yields of S2 with S1 was because of its increased growth and yield attributes parameters at wider spacing like primary, secondary branches, Stem girth, total dry matter production, harvest index, pods per plant and test weight which were expressed to its highest potential favoring for the best yield expression under transplanted conditions. The lower seed yields in S3 and S4 was because of its very low plant population even though the yield attributing factors are higher. Of the five test varieties Asha (ICPL 87119) recorded significantly highest seed yield of 3401 Kg/ha followed by PRG 158 (3033 Kg/ha) because of its harvest index (27.2), pod per plant and test weight. Asha variety reported the highest benefit cost ratio of 4.1 owing to highest net returns. Transplanting of Red gram at 120×90 cm in vertisols during Kharif helps the farmers in harvesting the highest seed yields.

Kandi Prakash Vani

Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University
India

Title: Integrated nutrient management in summer sesamum
Speaker
Biography:

Kandi Prakash Vani is currently working as a research scientist at Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, India.

Abstract:

As field trial was conducted at student farm; College of Agriculture at Hyderabad during summer 2013 to study the effect of integrated nutrient management on summer sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). The trial comprised of 9 treatments, i.e. 100% RDF alone, 75% and 50% RDF integrated with Farm Yard Manure, Vermicompost and Poultry Manure and Foliar sprays of Humic acid and Fulvic along with 100% RDF. Results of the present study indicated that sesamum responded well to applied fertilizers and organic manures. 100% RDF have shown higher growth parameters like plant height, DMP, Number of branches/plant and maximum yield parameters (Number of capsules/plant, Number of seeds/capsules, test weight) yield (seed and stalk yield) and oil content. Among organic manures vermicompost integrated with 75% RDF had resulted in higher growth, yield parameters, yield and oil content compared to other treatments.

Speaker
Biography:

Franc Bavec is currently working as a faculty member at University of Maribor, Slovenia.

Abstract:

It is confirmed that notable variations in opiate alkaloid concentrations may arise due to variations in the climate, soil composition, seed genes, the year of harvest, and the variety of poppy cultivated. In some countries, like in Slovenia, traditional foods exist like Prekmurska gibanica cake, which contains approximately 25% poppy seed; and makova potica, which can contain more than 50% of poppy seed. Because of opiates, four Slovenian rare populations and 5 varieties were analysed (content of morphine in µg per g of poppy seed) and used for consumption 10 g v.s. 20 g of seeds per person by the 33 students (3 repetitions plus control without poppy seed consumption). Morphine (µg per l) was calculated like as a ratio between content of morphine and U-creatinin (mmol/l). The results show great variation from 4.9 to 28.3 µg of morphine per g seeds in varieties produced in Slovenian and Czech temperate climate, to 44.4 and 46.0 µg of morphine per g seed in Turkish varieties, and from 133.7 µg in an unknown sample to 466.6 µg of morphine per g seed produced in Hungary. These values highly correlate with the content of morphine and codeine in the urine. On this basis, we discuss the limitations of poppy seed consumption regarding sportists, drivers and different ages (or body mass) of persons and which kind of restrictions for opiates in the poppy seeds are actual according to the international laws.

Speaker
Biography:

Maclin Dayod is currently the Head of Crop Breeding and Miscellaneous Crops Section in the Research Division of the Department of Agriculture Sarawak, Malaysia. Since 2012, his research work focuses on breeding for good eating quality in Oryza sativa L and varietal improvement in Solanum lasiocarpum Dunal. He is also responsible for the conservation and propagation of various crops which include pepper and other spices, herbs and medicinal plants. He had also researched on the impact of calcium on plant water channels (aquaporins) and uptake for his PhD and the physiological changes in barley due to water logging for his Master's degree.

Abstract:

Rice is an important staple for more than half of the world's population. Hence, increasing yield and nutritional quality of the crop to complement current strategies to reduce malnutrition are crucial. This study had evaluated the potential of calcium silicate and organic fertilizer as yield enhancers and bio-fortification fertilizers in rice. Results obtained show no difference in yield and other vegetative and reproductive parameters among all the treatments. There was also no difference in term of nutritional contents in the rice grain except for calcium and silicon. Soil-applied 1.36 t/ha of calcium silicate increases dietary silicon content in the grain to about 30% higher than the 1.76 t/ha of calcium silicate and 2.16 t/ha of organic fertilizer treatments but was comparable to the control. However, calcium silicate treated plants had about 30% lower calcium content in their grains than the control. The results from this study are in contradictory with the previous reports on the beneficial effects of calcium silicate application in rice and various other crops. Since calcium silicate is quite expensive, other sources of calcium and silicon, rate and time of applications may be explored.

Speaker
Biography:

Fhatuwani Mudau N is currently working as Professor at University of South Africa, South Africa.

Abstract:

Baby spinach (Spinaciaoleracea L.) is a member of the Amaranthaceae family. Baby spinach leaves have a very high respiration rate and the only main problems for keeping its post-harvest quality is tissue decay and off-odours development. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of post-harvest storage temperature and time on the quality of baby spinach since baby spinach has low shelf life. Baby spinach seeds were sown in a media composed of sand and plug mix (peat) with a composition of 50:50 under glasshouse. After 36 days all plants were harvested and the leaves were subsequently stored at 4˚C and 22˚C for 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 days, respectively and thereafter taken into incubator for 72 hours at 40˚C in order to dry up. Parameters recorded were mineral and trace element, total phenols, total carotenoids, flavonoids and antioxidant activities. The results of this study demonstrated that the quality of baby spinach deteriorates as the storage time and temperature increases. Storage time and temperature did not exhibit significant effects on selenium. The level carotenoid contents did not decrease at 4˚C after 6 days of storage, whilst at 22˚C the level of carotenoid contents declined after 2 days. Total polyphenols decreasedat 4˚C whereas at 22˚C decreased rapidly after 4 days of storage. Total antioxidant activities decreased after 2 days of storage at 22˚C, whereas at 4˚C total antioxidant activities decrease after 6 days. Vitamin C content remained at constant level at 4˚C and subsequently decreased after 6 days. Trace elements and bioactive compounds deteriorated at 22 ˚C hence at 4 ˚C stored for 6 days significantly lead to a high nutritional value in terms of bioactive compounds of baby spinach.

Speaker
Biography:

Balram Marathi has completed his PhD from premier Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, India and Postdoctoral studies from International Rice Research Institute, Los Baños Philippines. At present he is an Associate Professor at Institute of Biotechnology, Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University at Hyderabad, India. He has published and presented more than 40 research papers in reputed journals and at various national and international seminars. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member for Journal Rice Research and Reviewer for more than ten reputed journals. He is recipient of Assam State Government Gold Medal and Jawaharlal Nehru National Award for best research work in rice.

Abstract:

Increasing the yield potential is the major focus of rice breeding program. One of the main constraints for yield improvement is the narrow genetic base in popular cultivars. Recent reports from molecular mapping studies in different crops including rice indicate that phenotypically inferior wild species can contribute favorable genes for yield and thus providing a novel way for exploitation of wild relatives to broaden the genetic base to improve yield. The AA genome African wild species O. longistaminata is a perennial allogamous species was crossed with IR64 to develop a BC2F2 population for mapping of yield and yield component traits. The mean performance of traits in parents and range of trait values of population indicates transgressive segregation in favorable direction for all traits. Most of the yield component traits were normally distributed and skewed towards cultivated rice. A linkage map was constructed with 158 polymorphic markers and the total length of the map was 1840 cM with average marker interval of 12.6 cM. A total of 30 QTLs were identified for 9 yield and yield contributing traits. Major QTLs for yield traits were validated in Nipponbare/O. longistaminta and Taichung 65/O. longistaminta chromosome segment substitution lines and in IR64/O. longistaminta advanced backcross lines. The major QTLs for yield traits were introgressed into an elite New Plant Type (NPT) variety IR65600-81-5-3-2. The improved NPT lines with introgressed QTL regions from O. longistaminata showed increased panicle size and grain yield compared to the recurrent parent variety.

A V Ramanjaneyulu

Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University
India

Title: Trickle irrigation enhances rabi castor yield and water use efficiency
Speaker
Biography:

A V Ramanjaneyulu is currently working as research scientist at Prof. Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, India.

Abstract:

Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is a well known non-edible and industrially highly valued crop. Traditionally different parts of castor plant are being used in various sectors such as domestic, medical, agriculture, industry and of late ornamental. In the recent days, efforts are on for utilization of castor oil in biofuel programmes in different countries. At present it is cultivated in 30 different countries of which India, China, Brazil, Ethiopia and Thailand are the major castor growing ones accounting for about 90% of the worlds’ production. India alone produces about 70% of the castor production of the world. Thus, India is the world largest producers of castor seed and meets most of the global demand for castor oil. India accounts for nearly 66.5 and 82.9% of world’s castor area and production, respectively. India stands first both in area (1.21 million ha), production (1.76 million tonnes) and productivity (1455 kg ha-1) during 2013-14. In India, castor is grown in 13 states, however, only three states viz. Gujarat (78.3%), Rajasthan (15.6%) and erstwhile Andhra Pradesh (4.73%) together contribute 98.63% of the total production of castor. In South India, castor is mainly grown under rainfed conditions where the crop is severely affected by Botryotinia gray rot (BGR). Further, crop is also threatened by mid season or terminal dry spell leading to low productivity of 600-700 kg ha-1 which is far less than national average of 1455 kg ha-1. Thus growing castor under rainfed conditions was proved to be not profitable. Castor cultivation during rabi season with limited water is a new dimension where crop will not affected by BGR and also doesn’t face moisture stress. However, to circumvent the problems of water and electricity problems, trickle irrigation and fertigation was adopted. Four irrigation levels in main plots (I1: Irrigation @ 0.3 pan evaporation I2: Irrigation @ 0.6 pan evaporation I3: Irrigation @ 0.9 pan evaporation through trickle method and I4: Irrigation @ 75 mm CPE through check basis method) and four N levels (N1: N @ 40 kg ha-1 N2: N @ 80 kg ha-1 N3: N @ 120 kg ha-1 through fertigation and N4: N @ 80 kg ha-1 through pocketing) were tried in a split pot design replicated thrice. The experiment was conducted for two consecutive years during rabi 2010-11 and 2011-12 on a red sandy loam soil which was low in N, medium in Phosphorus and high in Potash. The results revealed that scheduling of irrigation through trickle method @ 0.9 pan evaporation resulted in significantly higher seed yield of 2978 kg ha-1 as compared to that of 0.6 pan evaporation (2674 kg ha-1) and 0.3 pan evaporation (1852 kg ha-1). Application of N @ 120 kg ha-1 through fertigation has recorded seed yield of 2980 kg ha-1 which was significantly superior to that of 80 kg N ha-1 (2672 kg ha-1) applied through fertigation. The higher yield in these treatments is mainly owing to significantly longer, total and effective no. of spikes and also no. of capsules per spike. Further, 80 kg N ha-1 applied through fertigation has significantly outyielded 80 kg N ha-1 applied through pocketing method (2456 kg ha-1). The seed yield obtained due to application of 40 kg N ha-1 through fertigation was found to be inferior to all treatments. Scheduling of irrigation water through trickle irrigation helped to save 30% water vis-à-vis check basin method. However, neither irrigation levels nor fertigation levels influenced the intercepted radiation by the crop canopy. Significantly higher main root area, sub root area and also total root area were found to be with trickle irrigation @ 0.9 pan evaporation and fertigation @ 120 kg N ha-1 through fertigation. The total root length was unaffected by irrigation treatments, however, fertigation @ 120 kg and 80 kg N ha-1 were found superior to rest of treatments.