Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture Beijing, China.

Day 3 :

  • Track 3: Agricultural Extension
    Track 10: Agricultural Risk Management
    Track 11: Sustainable Practices for Agriculture
    Track 12: Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness
Speaker

Chair

Milingoni Peter Tshisikhawe

University of Venda
South Africa

Speaker

Co-Chair

S ChandraShekhar

University of Agricultural Sciences
India

Speaker
Biography:

Ugbajah Maryjane O is currently working at Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Nigeria.

Abstract:

The study investigated financing of organic farming among small scale vegetable farmers in Onitsha L.G.A of Anambra state, Nigeria. Data for the study was obtained through structured questionnaire. Multistage random sampling technique was used to select 80 respondents used for the study. The statistical tools including frequency counts, percentages, means, ranking and likert scale were deployed for data analysis. Majority 78% of the respondents were females, and 58% had above 11 years of farming experience, the mean annual income of the farmers was N 76,400, 44% financed their enterprise through personal savings, majority 50% received between N 30,000 - N 50,000 loan, the most severe constraint to organic farming was poor output from agricultural investment, reinvestment of part of loan, unexpected expenditure at loan repayment period, lack of collateral. While constraints to credit demand included late disbursement of loan, high interest rate, lack of awareness of fund among others. The vegetable farmers in the area would be encouraged by the government and financial institutions through policies geared towards elimination of bottle necks, timely release of credit/loan, interest free loans/credit, involving the organic farmers in policy formulations that encourage the use of organic practices in agricultural productions.

Speaker
Biography:

S Chandrashekhar is working as Associate Professor at College of Sericulture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru and is involved in Teaching, Research and Extension activities since seventeen years. He organized and participated in many national and international conferences, workshops etc. and published more than 50 scientific publications including research articles, books etc. He is recipient of many State and University awards and served as PI and Co-PI for externally funded projects.He also served as NSS Programme Offi cer since 9 years and organized health camps, social environmental and national integration camps for the benefit of students and farming community.

Abstract:

Apart from the marvelous mulberry silk, which is quite popular the world over, there are few other varieties that are equally attractive. Among them, eri silk is becoming popular in recent years. Castor, a minor oilseed crop can be linked with eariculture to maximize the returns if right choice of castor genotype is made. Keeping this in view, castor can be exploited both for castor seed and leaf production which inturn helps in eri cocoon production. Th e study revealed that, high gross returns were realized by rearing eri silkworms on leaves of DCS-85 (Rs.30,584/ha). Th e genotypes 48-1 (Rs.21,636), DCH-32 (Rs.19,594) and DCS-9 (Rs.19,340) were found next best and the least with Local genotype (Rs.17,613). Net profi t was more with DCS-85 (Rs.16,534/ ha), However, it was less with Local genotype (Rs.4,643). Signifi cant variation in B:C ratio was observed among selected castor genotypes when they were used for both castor seed and eri cocoon production. B:C ratio was more with DCS-85 (1.777:1) followed by that in respect of 48-1 (0.578:1), DCH-32 (0.468:1), DCS-9 (0.421:1), DCH-177 (0.391:1) and Kranti (0.372:1). However, B:C ratio was least with Local genotype (0.358:1). Th us it is inferred that, castor genotype DCS-85 can be raised under rainfed condition for seed production and ericulture (at 50% defoliation) to earn more gross return (Rs. 30,584 / ha), net profi t (Rs. 16,534 / ha) and B:C ratio (1.777:1). Hence, DCS-85 genotype could be used with cost eff ectiveness for dual purpose of castor seed and eri cocoon production under rainfed situation.

Speaker
Biography:

Gabriel Ddamulira has completed his MSc in Agronomy from Makerere University, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Uganda. Currently he is finalizing his Doctoral Program in Plant Breeding and Biotechnology in the same University. He has published seven papers in reputed journals and eight in conference proceedings.

Abstract:

Developing common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) varieties resistant to angular leaf spot (ALS), a fungal disease caused by Pseudocercospora griseola (Sacc), is still hindered by 1) existing exotic resistance sources which are not well adapted to environmental conditions in Uganda and 2) high variability of P.griseola which complicates ALS control. These two factors necessitate continuous identification of new and broad sources of resistance to quicken the process of developing resistant varieties to reduce on the current yield losses. Seventy four landraces, four commercial varieties, and two controls were screened with four P. griseola races (1:6, 17:39, 21:39, and 61:63) to determine their resistance to ALS. The experiment was conducted in pots in a screenhouse to identity resistant genotypes and the effect of growth habit and seed size on ALS resistance. The experiment was factorially designed in randomised complete block design with three replications. Analysis of variance showed significant (P<0.05) variation in resistance among bean genotypes. Landrace (U00297), showed consistent resistance to four P. griseola races used in this study. But for commercial varieties, only recently released NABE 13 was moderately resistant to the four P. griseola races while the rest were susceptible. Seed size and growth habit were observed to influence genotype resistance to only mild P.griseola race (1:6) but not to virulent races. The results showed that U00297 was resistant to ALS under screenhouse conditions. This information generated will guide breeding programs targeting developing bean varieties resistant to ALS.

Speaker
Biography:

Milingoni Peter Tshisikhawe has completed his PhD in Plant Science in 2012 from the University of Pretoria in South Africa. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Botany at the University of Venda in South Africa. He has published 14 papers inaccredited peer review journals as well as a book chapter.

Abstract:

Conservation of biodiversity on agricultural farms, forests, and protected areas is likely to backup future livelihood options. The main objective of this research was to investigate the ethnobotanical importance of indigenous trees protected within agricultural farming system of Mutale local municipality.Tree layer of indigenous species were recorded and classified into families, parts used and their utilization purposes. Twenty two agricultural fields were visited and nineteen species were recorded. The 19 species were classified into sixteen families with Fabaceae, Combretaceae, Capparaceae being the dominating families. Sclerecarya birrea belonging to Anacardiaceae family was the plant species which was well represented in the agricultural farming fields, occurring in 21 farms, followed by Adansoniadigitata(19 farms)which belongs to Malvaceae family, and Bosciaalbitrunca (16 farms), Maeruaangolensis(15 farms) which both belong to the Capparaceae family. Shade use category amongst tree species protected within agricultural fields was the dominant category followed by medicine, food, demarcation fence, fodder, and firewood. Protection of these indigenous trees within agricultural fields will go a long way towards conservation of declared protected and endangered species.

Speaker
Biography:

Khathutshelo Magwede has completed his MSc from University of Venda (South Africa) and he is currently a registered PhD candidate at the University of Johannesburg (South Africa). He is employed as the Acadermic Chief Laboratory Technician at the University of Venda. He has published a paper in a reputed scientific Journal in December 2014.

Abstract:

The Vhavenda people had a rich social culture intrinsically embedded to the natural environment with their livelihood dependent on its sustainable utilization. The Vhavenda plant uses had been well documented through several studies that had reported on different use categories ranging from medicinal, vegetables, fruits, beverages, firewood, art and craft and building construction. Some of the plants species had been recorded to be utilized in more than one category. To access the information on Vhavenda plant uses several literature were consulted followed by an ethno botanical rapid appraisal survey within the Vhembe District Municipality. Data collected was used to analyse the family and category trends of plant species usage. The overwhelming majority of plants are used as medicine for humans and animals healthcare, more than 40 plant species are used as vegetables with hard wood plants mainly used for construction as well as art and craft. Six categorical uses were recorded for families; Anacardiaceae and Euphorbiaceae with Capparaceae, Celastraceae, Rhamnaceae, Papilionoideae as well as Rubiaceae used in five categories. The ethno botanical rapid appraisal survey revealed an informative data trend on plant uses from earlier times to present. It also gave indication on plant use dynamics through time.

Speaker
Biography:

David B Afful holds a PhD (Agricultural Extension) from the University of Fort Hare, South Africa and held a Postdoctoral fellowship at the same University 2012. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Agricultural Extension at the University of Limpopo, South Africa. He has published number of papers in reputed journals and serves as an external examiner for postgraduate studies at the University of Fort Hare, and a reviewer for a number of peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Smallholder agriculture in most developing countries world-wide including South Africa is largely rain-fed. Changes occurring in the Extension environment include the climate, globalisation and technological improvements. Broad political and scientific consensus exist that climate change and variability is happening and will continue well into the future with negative effects on food production and food security. Extension professionals, therefore, need to constantly develop and improve their capabilities to remain useful and relevant to farming communities.The purpose of the paper is to determine the extension agents’ competencies regarding coping strategies they promote and their effectiveness in contributing tosmallholder crop farmers’ food production in light of climate variability. The study adopted a multi-stage random sampling approach to select districts, municipalities and respondents. Semi-structured questionnaires were used tocollect data from 194 smallholder crop farmersin 20 villages from four municipalities of Limpopo province, South Africa in January of 2014. Extension managers and field-level extension agents of the Limpopo Department of Agriculture Extension service took part in the survey. Findings show that only one-third of survey respondents receive public extension services including information on climate variability coping assistance; this group finds the information useful for farm production. The most popular climate variability coping strategies promoted by most extension agents were conservation agricultural practices. Small yield differences between extension service and non-extension service recipients indicate agents need new competencies in how to apply coping strategies with producers. Study recommends involvement of extension agents, scientists and farmers in adaptive, municipality-specific trials on the effective implementation of conservation agricultural practices to enhance crop yields. There is need for agents to use multiple channels for effective communication to improve adoption of climate variability coping innovations which have the potential to improve crop yields.