Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture London, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Kelly T Morgan

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Smart irrigation: Agricultural water savings with improved irrigation scheduling

Time : 00:00

OMICS International Agri 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kelly T Morgan photo
Biography:

Kelly T Morgan and his research program has collected data and developed products that have led to substantial nutrient and water savings in Florida, with emphasis on citrus, vegetable and sugarcane production in central and south Florida, resulting in improved water quality. The sandy soils of Florida require substantial amounts of both nutrients and irrigation for maximum production. The emphasis of his research program has been field-scale nutrient and water use, which go together to improve water quality. He provides extension presentations state-wide to grower groups on improvement of nutrient use efficiency to improve yields as well as reduce impacts on water quality. He has used his research activates to develop crop models on both state-wide and local scales. As a result, he has led or co-led several modeling efforts to reduce water use and the impact of agriculture on water quality. These efforts are key to future sustainable agriculture.

Abstract:

Smart irrigation apps were developed by a working group of faculties from the University of Florida and University of Georgia. The apps provide real-time irrigation schedules for selected crops (i.e., avocado, citrus, cotton, peanut, strawberry, and vegetables). Irrigation schedules in the smartphone apps are based on evapotranspiration or a water balance methodology using real-time weather data from the Florida Automated Weather Network and the Georgia Environmental Monitoring Network. The FAO Penman-Monteith method is used for calculating reference ET, and crop coefficients (Kc) are applied based on time after planting, calendar month, or a crop’s phenological stage. The functionality of each app was customized for each user group considering the most common irrigation systems used. Custom features include water conservation options, splitting irrigation events, spreadsheet output emails, and notifications. App inputs vary by crop (primarily due to the irrigation system used); however, all apps require root depth, irrigation rate, and soil type except the strawberry app. App outputs also vary and include estimated reference ET, days between irrigation events, irrigation depth and duration, accumulated rain for previous seven days, and growing degree days. National Weather Service forecast data are also provided in the apps. The apps are available in Android and iOS stores. A limitation to the app irrigation schedules is the spatial variation in rainfall, given the finite set of weather stations. Future efforts will focus on more accurate inclusion of rainfall into the irrigation schedules generated by the Smart irrigation apps. Validation of the apps in multiple season replicated plots at grower fields resulted in water savings for citrus, tomato and lawn of 24%, 33%, and 57% respectively. Cotton app improved yield with similar recommended water amounts. 

OMICS International Agri 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter J Leggo, photo
Biography:

Peter J Leggo graduated from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland after a four-year Honours Geology degree course in 1959. He then gained his PhD degree from University of Bristol graduating in Geology and Mineralogy in 1963. Then, he joined Australia National University to work on Isotope Geochronology, 1963-65.  He continued this work during a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Leeds, 1965-68. He held an accepted Professorship at the Department of Geology, University of Florida, USA and later at the Department of Environmental Studies, University of Virginia, USA. On return to the UK in 1995, he became interested in Natural Zeolites which led to current work on biological plant fertilizers at the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge.

Abstract:

The adoption of a biological method of plant nutrition has proved to be extremely efficient. The method does not involve the use of chemical salts and the innovative approach to soil health and plant growth uses natural crushed zeolite rock and organic waste, either animal or plant. Zeolite minerals are well known to adsorb ammonia, which in this case, is produced by the decomposition of the organic waste. The slow release of the ammonia provides a gradual supply of nitrate ions that can be accepted by the growing plant. In this way, there is very little access to nitrate to diffuse into the soil. With phosphorus obtained from the organic waste by the activity of other micro-organisms and potassium, being available from the waste and soil, the three major elements (NPK) are present in ionized form which can be taken up by the growing plant. The ammonium ions, held by the zeolite are oxidized to nitrate by the activity of soil micro-organisms; not bacteria, as previously thought but Crenarchaeota (Archaea). This was confirmed by molecular biological studies conducted at the Department of Biotechnology, University of Cambridge. This way of providing nitrogen by biological oxidation of ammonia to nitrate (nitrification) involves enzymes which also produce hydrogen in a form which is very reactive. The reactivity of the hydrogen releases a range of ionized elements from the soil which provide minor elements in trace quantities required for strong plant growth. Organic material is essential to supply the carbon demand of soil micro-organisms. Due to the carbon demand of proliferating soil microbes, occurring from the use of chemical fertilizers, carbon is lost in the long-term. This loss leads to a change in soil structure and water holding capacity, resulting in a fragile soil which is prone to wind erosion. The dust bowls of the Midwest of the USA are a spectacular example of this effect. It is thought that the adoption of the more scientific organo-zeolitic-soil system, will be a step forward in plant nutrition.

Keynote Forum

P S Chaudhuri

Tripura University, India

Keynote: Sustainable agriculture through vermicomposting technology in India

Time : 00:00

OMICS International Agri 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker P S Chaudhuri  photo
Biography:

P S Chaudhuri is a Professor of Zoology at Tripura University (a central university), did his PG and PhD from the Calcutta University, Kolkata. He is an eminent earthworm scientist with more than 80 research papers in National and International Journals of repute. He is the author of the book “Kenchor Jeevan Baichitra: Kencho Prajukti (2006)” written in Bengali on the Biology and Ecology of earthworms in North-East India with special emphasis on vermiculture and vermicomposting. He has participated in more than 25 National and International Symposia and visited Avignon (France) 1990, Vigo (Spain) in 1998, Cardiff (UK) 2002 and Shanghai (China) 2016 to present his research papers in International symposia on Earthworm Ecology and Agricultural Sciences. He was elected as the Fellow of Zoological Society, Kolkata (1998) and Fellow of the Society of Applied Sciences, India (2010). His biography has been cited in the Who’s Who in Science and Engineering 2006-2007 (Marquis, USA). The Academic Forum of the Society of Earthworm Ecology and Environmental Research (SEEER) awarded Certificate of Appreciation to him as an Earthworm Biologist in 2012. He was selected as one of the “Inspiring Teacher of Tripura University”, Tripura in 2013. He has been honored with “Science Excellence Award” in 2015 and “Bharat Siksha Ratan Award” in 2016.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Green revolution in India (1967-1987) made the country self-sufficient in food grain production. However, indiscriminate use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides for the last few decades made the soil unproductive with loss of biodiversity and the environment polluted. So, rejection or reduced use of chemicals and practice of organic farming for recovery of soil health, increase in food grain production and biodiversity conservation have been suggested.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Epigeic earthworms such as Eisenia, Eudrilus and Perionyx have been successfully cultured in organic wastes kept in cemented tanks under suitable temperature (26°C-30°C) and moisture (50%-60%) conditions for production of vermicompost. Different doses (@2.5 tons/ha – 20 tons/ha) of harvested vermicompost were applied (RBD technique) in the soils of paddy, pineapple and tea plantations in Tripura.

Findings: Vermicompost, rich in plant-available nutrients (avN, avP, avK etc.) and plant growth factors, when applied to soil: improved soil aggregation, water use efficiency, nutrient uptake etc. Dramatic yields of paddy, pineapple and tea were recorded following application of 10-20 tons of vermicompost/ha. A significant (p<0.05) and gradual increase in density and biomass of earthworms were also noticed with increase in amount of vermicompost applied.

Conclusion & Significance: Crop yield was very much related to the concentration of vermicompost, beyond the level of which production declined. Vermicomposting and its application to soil has several advantages: i) reduce organic pollution, ii) produces organic manure for application in agro-ecosystems, iii) increases biodiversity, iv) production of high quality earthworm proteins from wastes and its utilization as feed for poultry birds and fishes.

  • Agricultural Engineering | Agriculture & Food Security | Plant Science | Agricultural Production Systems | Agricultural Biotechnology | Fertilizer & Pesticide | Agriculture & Forestry | Crop Sciences | Soil & Water Management

Chair

Kelly T Morganl

University of Florida, USA

Co-Chair

Gurudatt Hegde

University of Agriculture Sciences, India

Biography:

Abdul Khalil Gardezi is a distinguished Scientist and academic member of the Hydro Science Center, Postgraduate College in Agriculture Science in Mexico, since 1981. He has received distinctions for teaching, research and service from 1988 until 2016. He has been selected for the originality of his research, presented as the best paper and oral presentation from 2003 to 2016 in international congresses in Australia, Canada, China, Great Britain, Italy, Mexico and USA. He has published more than 190 papers. He has been honored among 2000 outstanding intellectuals of the 21st century by the International Biographical Center Cambridge, England.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a tropical crop, member of the Malvaceae family. Its flowers are widely used in Mexico, and other countries in infusions, deserts, and other food items. It is cultivated in small plots with low technology. A sustainable low cost technology is needed to increase the profits of the farmers.

Materials & Methods: The study was done under greenhouse conditions. Two soils were used. One came from a parcel irrigated with sewage water and the other one was irrigated with clean water from a well. Half of the treatments were inoculated with Glomus intraradices. Vermicompost was applied as a source of organic matter. Four doses were applied.

Findings: There were significant differences (p≤0.05) in all the variables recorded due to the treatments. The soil irrigated with contaminated water originated higher plant height and stem diameter, a better shoot and root development, and most importantly an increased fresh and dry weight of the calyx. The plants inoculated with Glomus intraradices had better shoot and root growth (p≤0.05). Vermicompost, as source of organic matter, also had a positive effect on roselle growth. Flower length, shoot fresh weight, and leaf area augmented with the application of higher quantities of organic matter (50 and 75 t ha-1).

Conclusion & Significance: Irrigation with sewage water, inoculation with Glomus intraradices, and higher quantities of vermicompost can be used to increase the calix yields on roselle. The use of mycorrhiza can help to overcome the negative effects of contaminated waters, and other environmental and biological stresses. Recommendations are made to validate this result under field conditions.

Biography:

Asiwe J A N is currently a Plant Breeder and an Integrated Pest Management Specialist at University of Limpopo, South Africa. He has several years of experience with successful track record in different aspects of commercial agriculture, food security, research and development in sub Saharan Africa (SSA) with significant impacts on legumes (cowpea, Bambara groundnut and soybeans), root and tuber crops (cassava and yam), cereals (maize, wheat and barley), intercropping systems (legumes with maize, sorghum/millet) in cross-setting professional areas (plant breeding, entomology and pest management, biotechnology and technology dissemination). He also possesses strong management and leadership skills in the following areas: strategic planning and implementation for distinctive competitive advantage and project management. Others include training and human capital development, financial management, sourcing funds for projects.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Cowpea is an important grain legume. It is cultivated because it is rich in protein (20-24%), minerals and vitamins which are important for human and animal nutrition. One of the major cowpea production constraints in South Africa is lack of improved varieties. To fast track the development of improved cowpea varieties to meet the needs of farmers, improved varieties were introduced and multiplied to increase seeds for further field assessments.

Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the nutrient, mineral contents and other quality traits of 32 cowpea lines obtained from GeneBank collections of University of Limpopo. This will assist the breeder in ascertaining their usefulness and plan on how to deploy their quality traits in breeding programme.

Materials & Methods: Dry seeds of varieties obtained from the seed multiplication programme were milled to fine powder, arranged in complete randomized design and analysed in three replications. Nutrient and mineral contents determined included (crude protein (CP), Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, P, K and moisture.

Findings: Results showed that the varieties exhibited significant (P<0.05) variations for the nutrients and mineral determined except for P, Cu and moisture. 10 lines performed better than two local control varieties (Glenda (24%) and Bechuana white (20%) in crude protein content with a range of 25-30%. Similarly, many varieties exhibited higher mineral content than the two local controls. Quality of grains of the varieties in terms of seed coat color, texture, eye-color and size also varied significantly.

Conclusions & Significance: The study not only demonstrated that many of the improved cowpea lines are better than local checks in nutrient contents and other quality traits, but has provided data base for utilizing the promising lines in breeding programme for the development of new cowpea germplasm with better quality traits and consumer preference. 

Birgit Steininger

University College for Agrarian and Environmental Pedagogy, Austria

Title: Benefits of gardens on human health and well-being
Biography:

Birgit Steininger has her expertise in Horticultural Therapy and Green Care. Developing the field of Horticultural Therapy and Green Care in Austria, she developed a University Certificate Degree in Horticultural Therapy and a Master’s Degree “Green Care: pedagogic, consultative and therapeutic Interventions with Animals and Plants”. Connecting agriculture and horticulture with human health and well-being as well as teaching and establishing research is the focus of her work at Agrarian and Environmental University College Vienna.

Abstract:

Statement of Problem: Gardening and garden related activities gain ground in learning and health promotion. Two main questions occurred: In which ways do gardens and places provide well-being and health? To what extent are activities (gardening or social interaction) relevant to promote well-being and health? Aim of this study is to find out benefits of gardens on human health and well-being.

Method: Using electronic databases, a comprehensive search of peer reviewed papers published between 1980 and November 2015 was conducted.

Results & Discussion: The reviewed papers showed that no clear separable answer for the main questions is possible, a highly complex interaction exists, and place and activity interact strongly. Research on private gardens is dedicated to all population groups. Existing research shows that private gardening is healthy for older persons. It is a meaningful activity that can be matched to the physical and psychological ability. Garden and nature activate and relax body and mind; research on community gardens focuses on interactive, communicative and connecting mechanisms while gardening for local food production; research on school grounds is related to the effects on school performance and their eating habits. Positive effects could be described; the main task of healing gardens is the promotion of intellectual and physical health, well-being and quality of life. Mainly positive outputs have been described, but persons with dementia can show negative effects as well. Physical benefits include higher levels of physical activity, better motor skills, and healthier nutrition behavior. Mental benefits include reduced mental stress, improved mood, better cognitive functioning, experienced achievement, and development and maintenance of identity in the garden. Social benefits include sharing knowledge and produce, better learning, feelings of social cohesion, and community involvement. These positive findings encourage application of garden-based-interventions.

Recommendations: The given body of knowledge encourages practical applications of garden-related interventions. These interventions should be planned with care and evaluated using established methods. 

Biography:

Niladri Paul received his B.Sc (Ag.) Hons degree in 2005 from Viswa Bharati, M.Sc (Ag) and Ph.D degree in Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science in 2007 and 2013, respectively. He secured first class in all examinations. He started his carrier as an Agricultural Officer under Government of Tripura in 2007 followed by as an Assistant Professor in Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry at College of Agriculture, Tripura in 2014. He had obtained Young Scientist Award in Acharya Prafulla Chandra Ray memorial symposium and celebration of International year of chemistry - 2011. He has 19 research publications and co-author of a Bengali book. He is regular in local daily and external examiner / paper setter in different Agricultural Universities. He is Editorial Board member in 5 journals. He is trained in Agri-Business Management, GIS application, biofertilizer production, watershed management.

Abstract:

The influence of organic matter vis-a-vis humic acids on the availability of nutrient status and its impact on the cultivation of rice (Variety MTU 1010) followed by mustard (Variety B-9), was studied in Typic Fluvaquent soil under Old Alluvial zone of West Bengal, India. Soil texture was identified as sandy clay loam, bulk density 1.34 Mg m-3, oxidizable OC 1.16 g 100gm-1, pH 6.34, total nitrogen 0.14 g 100gm-1, available phosphate, potash and sulphate 25.90, 127.40, 39.56 kg ha-1, respectively. Soils received recommended doses of fertilizers for cultivation of paddy (N:P2O5:K2O::60:30:30) followed by mustard (N:P2O5:K2O::80:40:40) along with FYM at 5.0 and 2.5 t ha-1, both Commercial and FYM extracted humic acid (CHA & EHA) at 0.5, 0.25 kg ha-1, respectively as per treatment combinations and following RBD treatment. Rhizosphere soil (0-15 cm) and plant samples were periodically collected and analysed for C:N ratio, available phosphate, potash and sulphur with their integral effect on crop growth. At PI and branching stages of paddy and mustard, the highest content of available phosphate, potash and sulphur was recorded and gradually decreasd towards harvesting stage. EHA resulted highest availability of phosphate and sulphur, however CHA enhanced the content of potash in soil, resulted significant uptake of nutrients within plants and qualitative enrichment through biometric parameters and yield.

Biography:

Kawsar Ali completed his PhD at the age of 26 years. He got his PhD Degree from the university of Agriculture Peshawar Pakistan. He also worked with Prof. Davey Jones of Environment Center Wales (Bangor University) in his lab. He God Two Gold Medals in his academic career. He Published more than 60 Papers in well reputed impact factor journals around the globe. He is also working as Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Research (www.ijaaer.com). Currently he is working on soil nuteints management and plant organic nitrogen uptake.

Abstract:

Formulation of amino acid N fertilizer and uptake of organic N by plants has the ability not only to ensure N availability to plants particularly in N-limiting environments but also can manipulate the environmental hazards associated with over inorganic N fertilization. To support this view, clear experimental evidence is still lacking. In addition, the current experiments aimed to evaluate the uptake of organic N (Amino acid based N fertilizer) by plants in comparison with inorganic fertilizer (ammonia and nitrate) and investigate the mineralization rate of amino acid fertilizers. Overall commercial amino acid performed superior in terms of plant growth and mineralization over pure amino acid fertilizer and inorganic N fertilizer. All plants measured parameters (shoot and root biomass, leaf chlorophyll content and tissue N content) were highest in plant samples treated with commercial amino acid fertilizer as compared to pure amino acid and inorganic N fertilizer. It is therefore concluded that organic N may be of only limited consequence in high input agricultural systems.

Biography:

Tawfik M M is a Professor of field crops. He completed his Graduation from Plant department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University. He worked at National Research Centre, Dokki, Egypt since 1985. He is interested in the field of forage production, bio-saline agriculture and climate change researches. He has published 101 papers, six books and chapters in books. In addition, he actively participated in oral lecture in 21 international conferences outside Egypt, actively organized many national conferences, workshops and forums in Egypt. He organized and implemented many scientific training in the NRC and many other international and national organizations. He is also working as an Editor in many national and international journals.

Abstract:

Applying organic farming systems in bio saline agriculture is unconventional approach for sustainable using of marginal soil and desert land for planting non-traditional halophytic crops such as Atriplex sp. These plants are highly salt tolerant C4 halophytic forage plants grown well in coastal salt marsh. It has a special place in newly emerging farming systems, especially in coastal areas and where freshwater resources are not available or in short supply. We can call it environmentally smart crops because it ensures food security, contribute to energy security, guarantee environmental sustainability, and tolerate the negative impacts of climate change. Organic agriculture is the most important and widely practiced agro-ecological farming system. It is claimed to be the most sustainable approach and long term adaptation strategy. It emphasizes recycling techniques and low external input and high output strategies. It is based on enhancing soil fertility and diversity at all levels and makes soils less susceptible to erosion. It is also reported to be climate change resilience farming systems as it promotes the proper management of soil, water, biodiversity and local knowledge and provide producers with ecologically sound management decisions. A field experiment was carried out at the Model Farm of National Research Centre, El Tour, South Sinai to study the impact of (charcoal 4 tons/fed, chicken manure 5 tons/fed and compost 5 tons/fed. In addition to control treatment) on some growth characters, photosynthetic pigments content, crude protein content and some physiological aspects as well as nutritive values of two halophytic plant species (Atriplex halimus and Atriplex nummularia). Our results showed that organic fertilizer treatment enhanced all the previous character as compared with control with superiority to chicken manure over the other treatments.

Biography:

Salah Abdel-Rahman is a Professor of molecular genetics at Department of Nucleic Acid Research Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications Alexandria, Egypt. PhD in 2003, Department of Molecular Animal Breeding, Institute of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture and Horticulture, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. Dr. Salah has an expertise in Mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting production traits on different chromosomes in farm animals using microsatellite markers. Improvement of quantitative production traits (meat, milk, fertility, wool…etc) in farm animals using marker-assisted selection (MAS). Detection of adulteration and identification of meat and milk plus genetically modified organisms (GMOs) using molecular genetics techniques. DNA fingerprinting and national animals and plants genetic sources preservation.

Abstract:

PCR and PCR-RFLP techniques were used for rapid and sensitive identification and authentication of species-specific meat (buffalo, camel, cat, cattle, dog, donkey, goat, horse, pig and sheep) and milk products (buffalo, camel, cattle, goat and sheep). PCR products of the gene encoding SSR region were 603, 603, ≤100 and 374 bp in buffalo, cattle, pig and sheep, respectively. For discrimination between buffalo and cattle, the amplified cytochrome b gene (359 bp) was digested by TaqI restriction enzyme. Two fragments 191 and 168 bp were generated in buffalo, whereas no digestion occurred in cattle (359 bp). PCR products were 672, 808, 221 and 221 bp in cat, dog, donkey and horse, respectively. To discriminate between donkey and horse, PCR product of mt-DNA in both donkey and horse (359 bp) was digested by AluI restriction enzyme. Three fragments 189, 96 and 74 bp were generated in horse, whereas no fragments were obtained in donkey (359 bp). PCR amplified fragment size was 300 bp in camel, while the fragment size in goat was 855 bp. The proposed PCR assay represents a quick and sensitive method applicable to the detection and authentication of meat and milk species-specific.

Biography:

Gautam Bhattacharjee completed his MSc in Zoology from the prestigious institution Visva-Bharati University Shantiniketan, West Bengal India, founded by Rabindranath Tagore. He worked as a Senior Research Fellow in a project of Indian Council of Agriculture and Research, New Delhi, under the guidance of Dr. P S Chaudhuri one of the greatest earthworm scientist of recent times. A detail work on earthworms of Tripura was carried out by him for the first time in Tripura from 1997-2002. During his research work, he reported 21 species of earthworms out of which two species were reported for the first time from Tripura. Beside this an excellent work on reproductive studies of seven tropical earthworms were done by him. He also carried out vermiculture of rubber leaf litters. He received scholarship from Jawaharlal Nehru Memorial Fund, New Delhi. At present, he is working as an Assistant Professor of Zoology in a Government Degree College (Swami Vivekananda Mahavidyalaya, Tripura, India) and is engaged with research on earthworms and their coelomic fluid.

Abstract:

With fade out of the benefit of Green revolution, indiscriminate use of chemicals (pesticides and fertilizers) made the soil unproductive with loss of soil health. Paddy is the main food crop of India which following 1990 had a declining trend in production due to poor soil health. So the main aim of our study was to determine the optimum dose of vermicompost on the production of upland paddy (var. TRC-87-251). Vermicompost was obtained from worm- worked kitchen waste utilizing the earthworms, Perionyx excavatus. The field experiment was laid out in randomized block design technique (figure given below). The experimental plots received three different treatments i.e., different doses of vermicompost, the same doses of vermicompost along with recommended doses of NPK and only recommended doses of NPK. The control plot received neither NPK nor vermicompost. In total, there were 12 treatments marked as T0, T1, and T2… T11. For each treatment, four replications were made. The size of each experimental plot was 5 m2 (2.5 m x 2.5 m). The different doses of VC were 2.5 ton/ha, 5 ton/ha, 10 ton/ha, 15 ton/ha and 20 ton/ha. Recommended doses of NPK=60 Kg N/ha, 30 Kg P/ ha, 30 Kg K/ ha in the form of urea, single super phosphate and muriate of potash respectively. Result showed that recommended doses of NPK along with 5 tonnes vermicompost/ha was at par with 10 tonnes of vermicompost/ha and led to significant increase in crop and straw production along with the uptake of nutrients. From this result, it could be deduced that in the soils of Tripura a minimum of 10 tonnes vermicompost or 5 tonnes of vermicompost plus recommended doses of NPK may bring significant increase in production of rice grain and straw respectively. The field trial was laid out in Randomized Block Design (RBD) technique comprising 12 treatments with 4 replications.

Biography:

Urea remains the most widely used nitrogen fertilizer worldwide. However, its massive losses during fertilization remain an impediment for its bio-availability to crops. Therefore, slowing down the leaching and volatilization of urea during crop fertilization has emerged as a solution to not only in saving the cost of food production but also preventing environmental damage caused by excess urea accumulation. Although, it has been suggested that nanotechnology might provide solutions to this difficult problem, thus far, practical strategies to do so have remained elusive. In this regard, we have developed urea coated hydroxyapatite nano-hybrid as a platform for slow release of nitrogen. Further, we argued that if the percentage of nitrogen in the above nanocomposite can be made close to that of urea, it would make such a solution economically viable. Thus, sol gel mixing of phosphoric acid and calcium hydroxide in the presence of urea gave rise to urea coated hydroxyapatite rod shaped nanoparticles containing 40% N. This resulting suspension was successfully flash dried to provide a stable solid nanocomposite with an average particle diameter of approximately 60 nm. The laboratory process was successfully scaled up to pilot plant without sacrificing the properties observed at the bench scale. It served as an unprecedented nitrogen slow release composition in water column studies at laboratory level. These encouraging results were validated by applying this nano-hybrid as a slow release nitrogen fertilizer formulation in farmer’s field trials for tea. The trials at farmer’s field level conducted in gravel soil (pH 4.5–5.0), with 50% reduction of the recommended amount of N as urea (293.5 kg/ha per year) and with the reduction of number of splits (2 splits per year) yielded an increase of 5% of the yield compared to the treatments conducted using urea (587 kg/ha per year, 4 splits). This nanotechnology based slow release fertilizer approaches therefore, have the capacity to multiply into many futuristic sustainable global fertilizer solutions.

Abstract:

Nilwala Kottegoda is a Professor in Chemistry at University of Sri Jayewardenepura, and a Principal Research Scientist at Sri Lanka Institute of Nanotechnology. She obtained her BSc in Chemistry from University of Peradeniya and PhD in Material Chemistry from University of Cambridge, UK. She is the principal author of few US patents which were granted for the research wok in nano agriculture and they are the first few patents granted to Sri Lanka for nanotechnology based innovations. She also received the national award for the best innovation with commercial potential in 2011 and the Third World Academy of Science Young Scientist award to Sri Lanka in 2013.

Biography:

Smita Purohit is presently working as a Senior Assistant Professor and Head in The IIS University, Jaipur, India. She has an expertise in the field of Plant Tissue Culture, Stress Physiology, Molecular Biology and Crop Science. The present research article signifies the effect of in vitro morphogenesis on antioxidative enzymes like SOD, CAT. These antioxidative enzyme systems provide crucial protection against oxidative stress imposed by reactive oxygen species.

Abstract:

The effect of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) on shoot bud induction and proliferation from nodal explants of Dianthus caryophyllus L. was investigated. Shoot buds were induced on MS medium supplemented with 2.2 µM BAP and 2.7 µM NAA. The induced shoot buds were sub-cultured on medium with same hormonal composition for their proliferation. Both shoot bud induction and proliferation media were supplemented with different levels of NH4NO3 (0, 5.15, 10.3, 20.61, 41.20 mM). NH4NO3 highly influenced the shoot bud formation and their subsequent proliferation. In the present investigation, NH4NO3 at one-fourth of MS level was found to be beneficial for controlling the hyperhydricity of regenerated shoots whereas the number of shoots was comparable to the control cultures. The MS or higher levels of NH4NO3 were observed to suppress healthy morphogenesis and resulted in increased hyperhydricity. The physiological disorder of hyperhydricity, commonly observed in carnation micro-propagation, was also controlled with 100% efficiency by reducing NH4NO3 at one-fourth of MS level. Antioxidant enzyme activity was minimum in normal and healthy shoots. The activity increased with increase in the number of hyperhydric shoots.

Antonia Carlucci

Universita' degli Studi di Foggia SAFE, Italy

Title: Update of grapevine trunk disease fungi occurred in Italy
Biography:

Antonia Carlucci is a Researcher in the Department of Sciences of Agriculture, Food and Environment in Foggia, Italy. She is also head of plant pathology and
diagnosis laboratory for quarantine fungal and bacterial pathogens in University of Foggia. Dr. Carlucci received her PhD in Biotechnology of agricultural and food products from University of Bari, Italy. She is expert of morphological and molecular characterization of fungi by phylogenetic studies. She has been involved in many research projects related to Plant Pathology and described ten novel fungal species by molecular approaches. Dr. Carlucci has been interesting to research and study new control means regarding the solarization practice, use of biostimulants, resistance inducers, fungal antagonists and biocides substances.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Grapevine trunk diseases represents an important topic form many countries worldwide. A great number of fungi affects vineyards from root to trunk, stem and berries. Regarding the trunk diseases, black foot disease, Botryosphaeria dieback and Petri disease fungi are the most important causing severe reduced yields.
Aim: The purposes of the present study was to identify the most common and spread grapevine trunk disease fungi occurred on vineyards in southern Italy through morphological and molecular approaches. To confirm the pathogenicity ability of some fungal species were carried out pathogenicity tests.
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: By molecular tools, the ITS region, the β-tubulin and elongation factor, and partial histone 3 genes were amplified and sequencing to perform the phylogenetic analyses. A detailed morphological study was also carried out. Pathogenicity tests were performed on 1-year-old shoots with the representative fungal species isolated from grapevine samples. The data collected were statistically analysed.
Findings: In this study, a new fungal species was described as Thelonectria blackeriella and together Dactylonectria torrensensis and Ilyonectria liriodendri it was associated with black foot disease for first time in Italy. In addition, Lasiodiplodia citricola, known as fungal pathogens of Citrus sp., Juglans regia, and Prunus persica, was isolated from grapevine, and so associated with cankers and dieback of grapevine both for Italy and for the rest of the world. Conclusion & Significance: Our studies showed that the fungal population inhabiting the grapevine wood is very various and spread worldwide ranging from black foot disease to Petri disease and Botryosphaeria dieback. The finding of T. blackeriela and of L. citricola demonstrated that number of fungi associated with these diseases is always increasing.

Biography:

Shekharappa works as a Professor of Entomology in the Institute of Organic Farming, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India. He has worked as an Instructor during 1988-1992 at College of Agriculture, Raichur; Assistant Plant Protection Specialist (Ent) during 1992-1996 at Extension Education Unit, Raichur; Asst. Entomologist during 1996-1997 at AICCIP, ARS, Dharwad Farm, Hebballi; Asst. Entomologist during 1997-2002 at AICRP on Midge, UAS, Dharwad; Sr. Entomologist during 2002-2010 at AICSIP, UAS, Dharwad; Professor (Entomology) 2010-2015 at AICSIP, UAS, Dharwad and currently working as a Professor of Entomology since 2015 at IOF, UAS, Dharwad. He has also trained Post graduate and PhD students. He was awarded “Environmentalist of the Year Award 2008” conferred by National Environmental Science Academy, New Delhi during 21st Annual Conference held at Bangalore University, Bangalore, India.

Abstract:

The experiment was conducted to know the effect of organic, integrated and inorganic management practices on the incidence of insect pests in groundnut and cotton intercropping system during 2015-2016 to 2016-2017 at Institute of Organic Farming, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka, India. In groundnut, the per cent defoliation due to Spodoptera litura ranged from 11.5 to 16.75 in different farming systems. However, the incidence was more in organic as compared to integrated and inorganic management practices. Similarly, the studies made in cotton revealed that the per cent boll damage due to Helicoverpa armigera varied from 8.19 to 12.75 in different farming systems. The incidence of bollworms was less in integrated and RPP and found on par with each other and differed significantly with organic farming. The similar trend was observed with aphids and leafhoppers where as the incidence was less than ETL. The natural enemies’ viz., coccinellids and Chrysoperla were observed more in organic as compared to other farming systems.

Biography:

Jose Ramon Barros Cantalice is an Agricultural Engineer, PhD in Soil Science and Post-doctoral made at Texas A & M University, USA. He is currently Associate Professor of the Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco. He has experience in Agronomy, Environmental Engineering, with emphasis on Management, Soil Conservation, Water Conservation, Soil and Water Engineering, acting on the following topics: mechanics of erosion, sediment transport, rill and interrill erosion, design riparian zones, soil quality, sediment yield from watersheds in the semiarid, and relations of hydrology and cover of the shrubs. He is an Adviser of PhD and Master’s in Soil Science and Environmental Engineering.

Abstract:

Arid and semiarid areas has a hydrological rainfall pattern characterized by variability, intense rainfall, as the rainfall volumes are concentrated into short periods of time with widely varying temporal recurrence of rainfall events consequently, high peak flows occurred. In most of Brazil semiarid he conventional soil management still is burning for the establishment crops. In this soil use, the natural resources are under risk and prone to degradation. In this conditions the soil use capacity of semiarid watersheds is soon exceeded due to soil cover of shrub decrease. The major degradation sign is the water erosion that generates the sediment through interrill, rill and gully erosion. The fluvial systems of arid and semiarid environments are featured by periods without flow, and the suspended sediment transport can occur in high suspended sediment concentration values in ascending hydrograph, which are associated with the sediment in the entrainment threshold that deposited in the preceding year. In this context, we are developing a project in a small watershed with 14.71 km2 (Carnauba Watershed from Brazilian semiarid) in which the farmers are seeding corn, beans and cactus without burn residues to prepare the soil through environmental compensation, as a mitigation to climate changes. In this project are included 10 farmers during two years in the Carnauba watershed, in which the flow and suspended sediment are been monitoring, and in the project end it will be expect to observe decrease in suspended sediment flux.