Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th International Conference on Agriculture & Horticulture Zurich, Switzerland.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Mohammad Babadoost

University of Illinois, USA

Keynote: Improving crop production in developing countries

Time : 00:00

Conference Series Agri 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad Babadoost photo
Biography:

Mohammad Babadoost completed his Ph.D. in plant pathology at North Carolina State University. In 1999, he joined the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he is now a Professor of Plant Pathology and Extension Specialist. Mohammad conducts research and extension programs on the biology and management of vegetable and fruit crops diseases, and teaches “Plant Disease Diagnosis and Management.” He has served as an editor of several peer-reviewed journal in the United States and worldwide. Dr. Babadoost has 53 peer-reviewed and more 300 extension articles. He has developed a profound commitment for establishing food security in the world.

Abstract:

According to the reports by the United Nations, more than 800 million people in the world in 2016 were chronically undernourished. To improve food security, establishing sustainable food crop production in the world is essential. Despite losing some of the productive agricultural lands to urban developments throughout the world, there are still considerable land areas with plenty of water that can be utilized for production of food crops. However, despite vast efforts on plant protection, more than 30% of food crops and products are lost to plant pests (diseases, insects, and weeds). The losses are much higher in the developing countries than developed countries. To improve crop production and minimize the losses, establishing/strengthening national agricultural programs is essential. Productive agricultural programs require strong teaching, research, and extension establishments in every nation. Problem-solving in every area of the world should be based on the credible local research, complimented with credible and timely information-delivery to the end users. External helps are valuable, but they will be more productive if the helpers have satisfactory knowledge of the ethnical cultures of the assigned areas. Despite of the tremendous international efforts, effective problem-solving in production of food crops in the developing countries will be achieved by training local experts on teaching, research, and extension is agricultural disciplines.  

Conference Series Agri 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nityananda Khanal photo
Biography:

Nityananda Khanal is a Forage Research Scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. He has his expertise in the agronomy of forage, field and horticultural crops with diverse work experience from tropical to temperate region, from subsistence-oriented to mechanized industrial production systems from Canada, Thailand and Nepal. His current research focuses on developing crop management practices for enhancing seed yield and quality of forage seed crops and designing cropping systems with a rational integration of perennial forage seed and annual food crops.

 

Abstract:

Peace River region covering about 230,000 square kilometers around 55° north latitude and 119° west longitude is the north western agricultural frontier of Canada. The cropping environment is typified by long photoperiods during short growing season and predominance of acidic luvisolic soils with poorly developed profile. This region has evolved to be one of the major pockets of seed production of forages and turf-grasses which are exported to 34 countries with major proportion destined to the USA, China, Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Denmark and Argentina. Creeping red fescue seed constitutes major bulk of export with primary use as turf-grass for lawns and gulf courses in the temperate regions. Despite being one of the pioneer crops in the region, relatively few publications exist about yield constraints analysis and optimal crop management practices. The knowledge and technology gaps are manifested by the stagnation in seed yield of the crop. This presentation synthesizes the results of studies on creeping red fescue in the Peace River region. Relevant information will also be excerpted from studies about the temperate forage seed crops to identify potential agronomic options and knowledge gaps for enhancing the seed yield of creeping red fescue.

Keynote Forum

Jose J Pueyo

Institute of Agricultural Sciences - CSIC, Spain

Keynote: Strategies to improve tolerance to abiotic stress in legumes

Time : 00:00

Conference Series Agri 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jose J Pueyo photo
Biography:

Jose J Pueyo is a Full Professor and Research Group Leader at the Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in Madrid, Spain. His scientific interests include the biotechnological improvement of legume crops and the study of beneficial plant-microbe interactions under environmental constraints. After obtaining his PhD, he worked as a Research Assistant at University College Dublin, Republic of Ireland, as a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, San Diego, and at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA as a Research Associate. He then joined the Centre for Environmental Sciences, CSIC, where he was later appointed Director. He has been a Member of CSIC Committee on Agricultural Sciences, Vice-Chair of CYTED (Latin-American Programme on Cooperation in Science and Technology) Committee on Sustainable Development and Chair of COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Committee on Food and Agriculture. He also works as a Scientific Advisor for the State Research Agency, where he manages several agri-food ERA-Nets.

Abstract:

Legumes play a key role in sustainable agriculture. Mineral nitrogen deficiency is an important limiting factor for plant growth in arid and semi-arid regions, and rhizobia-legume symbioses are the primary source of fixed nitrogen in such areas. The introduction of legumes and their nodulating rhizobia may have an important effect on the reclamation of degraded, polluted, saline, marginal soils for sustainable agriculture. Such recovery is becoming an urgent matter due to climate change, the increasing extension of salinized land and the ever-rising requirements for food and feed. In general, both rhizobia and legumes have a low or moderate tolerance to abiotic stress. Moreover, symbiosis and nodule functions are very sensitive to abiotic stress, more so than the host legume or the rhizobia. Thus, it is of interest to obtain bacterial inocula and legume varieties with enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress for use in soil reclamation, which can be achieved by traditional trait selection or by biotechnological procedures. We will present our results on the selection of tolerant legume cultivars and rhizobial strains, as well as our biotechnological approaches to obtain legumes and rhizobia with improved tolerance to abiotic stress. Omics analyses and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) appear as optimal tools for elucidating the physiological and molecular mechanisms that determine sensitivity or tolerance to abiotic stress in the symbiotic system, which might help define strategies to obtain nodulated legumes with enhanced tolerance to environmental stresses that act efficiently in reclaiming and exploiting marginal soils.

 

Keynote Forum

Daran Rudnick

University of Nebraska Lincoln, USA

Keynote: Quantifying and correcting for clay content effects on soil water measurement by reflectometers

Time : 00:00

Conference Series Agri 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Daran Rudnick photo
Biography:

Daran Rudnick obtained his BS, MS and PhD Degrees from the University of Nebraska Lincoln, USA. He is currently an Assistant Professor and Irrigation Management Specialist in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering at the same university. His research focuses on improving irrigation management strategies for commonly grown crops and rotations found in the semi-arid climate of west central Nebraska. His research projects include the evaluation of deficit irrigation strategies for maize and soybean under center pivot and subsurface drip irrigation systems, integration of variable rate irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer management, assessment of residue removal effects on maize yield and crop water use and field and laboratory evaluation of soil water monitoring equipment.

Abstract:

Clay content could affect the calibration of electromagnetic soil water sensors including reflectometers. To investigate this effect further, three TDR315 and three CS655 reflectometers were installed in each of five soils with clay content ranging from 5 to 49%. As the soils were dried in a temperature-controlled room, sensor reported soil volumetric water content (θv) according to factory calibration was compared against reference θv determined by weighing the soils. Sensor-reported θv was similar to reference θv in the sand (root mean square difference (RMSD) <0.02 m3 m-3), but the discrepancy was larger for the clayey soils. An increase in clay content tended to cause TDR315 to underestimate low θv and tended to cause CS655 to overestimate θv curvilinearly. At the levels evaluated in this experiment, differences in clay content produced a larger effect than temperature (24 versus 35°C) and salinity (0 versus 3.09 g/L CaCl2) on the accuracy of the factory calibration for both sensors. Soil-specific empirical calibrations developed using quadratic regression fitted the experimental data very closely (R2>0.93) for both sensors. By estimating calibration coefficients based on clay content alone and then adjusting sensor-reported θv accordingly, RMSD from reference θv was approximately halved for both sensors. Applying the same procedure to independent literature data resulted in improvements in a soil with 39% clay content but deterioration in a soil with 17-18% clay content. A clay content correction can enhance the accuracy of some reflectometers and electromagnetic sensors for soil water measurement.

Session Introduction

Susan Haddock

University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, USA

Title: Florida-friendly landscaping™: a grass-roots horticulture program that promotes urban environmental stewardship
Speaker
Biography:

Susan Haddock educational background includes a BS in Environmental Horticulture from the University of Florida; BS in Biology from Old Dominion University and a MBA from the University of California, USA respectively. She is currently working in the University of Florida Institute of Agricultural Sciences County Extension Agent III. She has served the commercial horticulture industry of Hillsborough County and southwest Florida since March 2010 by providing educational resources, programs, diagnostics and site visits in the areas of sustainable urban horticulture practices, water quality and conservation, integrated pest management, and pesticide safety. 

Abstract:

Situation: The State of Florida projects its current population of 20 million will grow to nearly 26 million over the next two decades, and will increase in tax on available water resources as well as increase in surface and ground water pollution. A recent strategic study on the state’s water resources, “Water 2070: Mapping Florida's Future - Alternative Patterns of Water Use in 2070", found that the state’s ongoing Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ (FFL) program is fundamental to reducing future water demand and protecting water quality.

Methodology: The University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) administers FFL, with state and federal funding provided by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the US Environmental Protection Agency. FFL provides educational outreach to homeowners through its Florida Yards & Neighborhoods program and to commercial landscape professionals through the Green Industries Best Management Practices (GI-BMP) program. These programs promote quality landscapes through appropriate landscape design, while reducing nonpoint source pollution through reduced water, fertilizer and pesticide use. The FFL program educates citizens through a statewide network of Extension agents affiliated with UF/IFAS Extension. The agents coordinate an extensive volunteer network of over 4,000 citizen Master Gardeners and work cooperatively with over 41,000 landscape industry professionals certified (from 2006 through 2016) in GI-BMP. FFL legislation requires GI-BMP training and state licensing for all landscape workers who apply fertilizer commercially.

Results: Florida state legislation, passed in 2009, found that FFL serves a compelling public interest in water conservation, protection and restoration, that participation by homeowner associations and local governments is essential, and that deed restrictions or local ordinances may not prohibit FFL use by homeowners. During 2016 alone, the FFL program directly reached 155,750 homeowners through in- person workshops, conducted 6,051 home consultations, and certified 4,051 persons in GI-BMP. Other countries can easily replicate this program.

Stefan Gandev

Fruit Growing Institute, Bulgaria

Title: Modern techniques for walnut propagation
Speaker
Biography:

Stefan Gandev is a Full-Time Professor at the Fruit-Growing Institute in Bulgaria. He is the Head of the Department of Propagation, Breeding and Biotechnologies and the Director of the Institute. In the past decade he has focused his research on walnut propagation and growing. His scientific interests are also focused on problems related to fruit tree architecture, pruning for better fruit-bearing and organic production of fruits. He is the author of over 80 publications and three monographs. He is a Member of international committees and has chaired a many scientific sessions in international fora.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Propagation of walnut (J. regia L.) is more difficult compared to most of the fruit species. It is due to the low rate of callus formation and the presence of high concentration of phenolic compounds. Because of walnut heterozygosity, propagation by seeds does not lead to inheritance of the characteristics of a certain variety. For that reason, different methods of walnut propagation have been investigated all around the world.

Aim: The aim of the present study is to discuss the modern techniques for walnut propagation.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Two new methods of walnut propagation were presented in the survey – hot callus and epicotyl grafting. All the details of the technological process were discussed – rootstock production, scion selection, technique and time of grafting, temperature conditions, etc. The results obtained were compared to other widely accepted and popular methods and theoretical and practical conclusions were made, which result in increasing the percentage of successfully propagated walnut plants.

Conclusions & Significance: It was concluded that the described methods of epicotyl grafting and hot callus are suitable for walnut propagation and they can be applied in practice in industrial scale propagation of the fruit species.

Speaker
Biography:

Eduardo Valdés Velarde is a Professor of Ecology in the Department of Plant Science of Chapingo Autonomous University in Mexico since 2007. He is currently the Director of the Agroforestry Center for Sustainable Development at the same university. He has been a Teacher of high school, undergraduate and graduate students since 1997, lecturing more than 25 subjects. He has been the Director and thesis Adviser for more than 25 undergraduate and graduate students. He has given numerous lectures and courses-workshops in several universities in Mexico and Ecuador. He has been responsible for several research, cultural diffusion, service and technology transfer projects. His main lines of research focuses on the study of ecosystem services in mangroves, cacao and coffee plantations.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The cocoa agroforestry system (CAS) is one of the most important in the state of Tabasco, Mexico. The CAS can store quantities of carbon (C), even higher than some natural forests. Under humid tropics conditions, the size of the soil organic matter (SOM) stores is small and rapidly degrades, so that soil fertility can be quickly depleted making the agroecosystem highly dependent on the supply of fertilizers.

 

Objectives: The objective of this research was to measure the concentration of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other variables indicating soil fertility, in a chronosequence of pastures that were established on cocoa plantations.

 

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The research was carried out at Jalpa de Méndez, Tabasco, Mexico. Sites that were previously CAS were selected and that currently record a change in land use. With the years of change reported by farmers, the following intervals were established: 1-5 years (PZ 1-5), 6-10 years (PZ 6-10) and 11-20 years (PZ 11-20). At each site samples were taken at three depths (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-30 cm).

 

Results: The results indicate that during the first years, the land use changed (PZ 1-5) given a slight decrease in the levels of SOC. Although these increase in the pastures of 6-10 years (PZ 6-10), inclusive above the levels recorded in CAS 20-35. However, this increase is temporary, since it is observed that these storage levels decrease in pastures 11-20 years (PZ 11-20). In the long term, the change of land use from CAS to pasture reduces the SOC stores and some chemical and physical properties. In the first years of the change the reduction of the SOC content is reflected in the young pastures (PZ 1-5). In older pastures (PZ 11-20) the chemical and physical properties declined and the content of the SOC decreases to level below CAS 20-35. 

Speaker
Biography:

Partha Sarathi Nath pursued his MSc and Ph.D. Degree in Plant Pathology from Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia West Bengal, India. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at the same university and has been teaching Plant Pathology to undergraduate and post graduate students for more than thirty two years. He has guided 7 PhD students and 15 MSc students regarding epidemiology and management plant diseases and IDM research. He has so far published 75 papers in national and international journals, 1 book chapter and has published one monograph on plant virus. He served as an Academic Administrator like Head of the Department and Officer In Charge AIC Vegetable Improvement Project. He is a Fellow of the Society of Association for Advancement in Plant Protection.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Chilli is one major vegetable crops of the world with India being one of the important producers. Most of the commercial varieties grown in the state were found susceptible to powdery mildew and chemical control has been the most effective method adopted by farmers to protect their crops. But continuous use of same fungicide has developed resistance against powdery mildew pathogen (Leveillula taurica), reduced the appeal of chemicals and has led to the search of new fungicides. The study was conducted to evaluate a new fungicide to control the disease. Efficacy of different dosages of IKF-309 180SC was tested in the field condition along with Azoxystrobin 23% SC and Tebuconazole 25% WG.

Methodology: Field experiment was carried out to evaluate the performance of new fungicide IKF-309 180SC and compare with two other fungicides against powdery mildew disease at University Instructional Farm, West Bengal, during winter season. The four different dosages of fungicide IKF-309 180SC (@72g ai, 90g ai, 108g ai and 126 g ai/ha), Azoxystrobin 23% SC (@125g ai/ha) and Tebuconazole 25% WG (@ 187.5g ai/ha) were sprayed over the crop against this disease, three sprays of each chemical with desired concentrations were applied starting from the first appearance of the disease at ten days interval.

Findings: The results showed that IKF-309 180SC @ 126 g ai/ha and IKF-309 180SC @108 g ai/ha significantly reduced the disease and also increased the yield in comparison to other fungicides and untreated control. Among the six meteorological factors temperature (Maximum Minimum) relative humidity (Maximum Minimum) and rainfall were significantly co-related with disease progression.

 

Conclusion & Significance: In West Bengal condition the powdery mildew could be controlled by three sprayings of IKF-309 180SC @108 g ai/ha. Temperature, relative humidity and rainfall correlated on disease progression but no effect could be found on sunshine hours.

Speaker
Biography:

Umi Pudji Astuti is a extention in Indonesian Agency for Agricultural Research and Development (IAARD) Ministry of Agriculture. She is the Coordinator of Monitoring and Evaluation Assesment and Dissemination activity at Assessment Institute of Agriculture Technology Bengkulu. She is a Member of the Improvement of Extension Capacity in the Acceleration of Agriculture Innovation Development in Yogyakarta province.

Abstract:

The effectiveness of agricultural extension is determined by components in agricultural extension system among others are agricultural extension methods. Effective methods should be selected and defined based on the characteristics of target, resources, materials, and objectives to be achieved. Citrus agribusiness development in Lebong is certainly supported by the role of stakeholders and citrus farmers, as well as the proper dissemination of methods. Adoption process in extension substantially can be interpreted as changes of behavior process such as: knowledge (cognitive), attitudes (affective), and skill (psycho-motoric) in a person after receiving "innovation" from extension submitted by target communities. The output of this study: 1) to analyze the effectiveness of field trial methods in improving cognitive and affective farmers; 2) knowing the relationship of adoption level and knowledge of farmers; 3) to analyze the factors that influence farmers' adoption. Method of this study are field day and survey to 40 respondents in Rimbo Pengadang Sub District, Lebong District in 2014. Analyzed data was done by descriptive and statistical parametric (multiple linear functions). The results showed that: 1) field trip method is effective to improve the farmer knowledge (23.17%) and positively affect the farmer attitude; 2) the knowledge level of PTKJS innovation farmers "positively and very closely related".; 3) the factors that influence the level of farmers' adoption are internal factors (education, knowledge, and the intensity of training), and external factors respondents (distance from the house to the garden and from the house to production facilities shop). 

Speaker
Biography:

Srikanta Das pursued his MSc and PhD Degree in Plant Pathology from Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya, Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal. He is currently a Professor in the Department of Plant Pathology at the same university and has been teaching the subject to undergraduate and post graduate students for more than thirty one years. He was invited by Bangladesh Agricultural University, France, Chiang Mai, Thailand, American Chemical Society and Berlin for presentation of his research findings on different international congress. He has guided 10 PhD students and 13 MSc students. He has so far published 89 papers in national and international journals, 3 book chapters and several conference proceedings. He served as an Academic Administrator like Head of the Department and Dean Faculty of Agriculture; has regularized the academic calendar and modernized the teaching methodology. He is a Fellow of the Society of Association for Advancement in Plant Protection and life member of different professional bodies.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Chilli is produced in India having the highest share of production of spice crops, vulnerable to many diseases and chemical control has to be the only option adopted by farmers to protect their crops from biotic pathogens. Continuous use of conventional chemicals caused resistance against these pathogens. Second generation chemicals have proved as a new ray of hope in management of diseases.

Methodology: Field experiment was conducted to find out the effect of different metrological factors on severity of bacterial leaf spot, Cercospora leaf spot and dieback of chilli caused by Xanthomonas campestris, Cercospora capsici and Colletotrichum capsici respectively under six chemicals treatment during 2017-18. The four different dosages of Kasugamycin 3% SL @ 22.5 g, 30.0 g and 37.5 g a.i. h-1, Azoxystrobin 23% SC @ 125 g a.i. h-1 and another one pre-mix chemicals Metiram 55% + Pyraclostrobin 5% WG @ 1050 g a.i. h-1 were applied in field over the crop against this diseases, three sprays of each chemical with desired concentrations were applied starting from the first appearance of the disease at ten days interval. Different prediction equations were developed for each chemical treatments separately through step down multiple regression analysis.

Findings: Different meteorological factors had different effect on increase of disease severity of these three different diseases. It was found that all the chemicals reduced the three diseases significantly in comparison to untreated control. The progress of disease severity was also minimum in these treatments. Kasugamycin 3% SL @ 30.0 g a.i. h-1 showed maximum reduction in disease severity with high fruit yield in comparison to other treatments. Among the meteorological factors considered only average temperature (Tmin), RHmin and total rainfall (Rt) were found to act positively and significantly whereas bright sunshine hours had negatively significant effect on progress of severity for the three diseases in chilli.

Speaker
Biography:

Heni Purwaningsih has completed her PhD at University of The Philippines Los Banos in 2017, College of Human Ecology and the Faculty of Human Nutrition and Food. She is Researcher at Yogyakarta Assessment Institute of Agriculture Technology. She has expert in the post-harvest technology.

Abstract:

Taro is one of the local food commodities which has not received attention and have the opportunity to be developed. One type of taro is Satoimo (Colocasia esculenta var antiquorum). The superiority of Satoimo is can be cultivated on open land or under other plant stands. Based on result of researches, Satoimo able to grow shaded up to 70%. Production potential in sandy soil is higher (3.4kg / m2) than in the yard (2.04 kg / m2) with various characteristics. Utilization of Satoimo in Indonesia into various products such as flour with 24% yield of flour taro Japan has a high enough nutritional content, with high protein content 8.85% while fat content 0.56% lower than taro in general 1.64%, starch (63, 51%), amylose 11,10%, amylopectin 52,91%, calorie 92.30kal, carbohydrate 16.33g, calcium 9mg, phosphor 5g and fiber content 16.18%. Generally Satoimo flour has a different white degree with flour. Diversification of processed products of taro other than flour is also used for processed cake like brownies steamed with 25% and 25% wheat flour substitution in accordance with preference consumer. Besides that Satoimo was made juice because it contains hyalitrotic acid, collagen, protein compound that is believed to anti aging process of the skin so that the opportunity for cosmetic ingredients. Result of farming system analysis R/C ratio is R/C>1 so suitable to cultivated. Based on the potential and utilization of  Satoimo still needed to be preserved as one of germplasm in Indonesia.

Speaker
Biography:

Silvia M Avilés has her expertise in soil fertility, Sustainable Use of Soil and Water Research Group. Her evaluation is based on fertility in the soil on agricultural production systems in arid zones that let to get information to improve the management of fertilizers, soil and water, taking in account climate change and greenhouse gases emissions. She has been working for several years in research, evaluation and teaching in diferent universities.

Abstract:

Conventional tillage systems in the production of agricultural crops often, use excessive application of nitrogen fertilizer, which is a source of generation of greenhouse gases (N2O and CO2). The information regarding the assessment of greenhouse gases emissions in conventional fertilization a system, which is most widely used in the Mexicali Valley, is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the CO2 emission, organic carbon and soil nitrogen related to the application of nitrogen fertilizer in a soil cultivated with wheat under conventional tillage in the Mexicali Valley, Baja California. The experimental plot, with a soil Aquic Haplotorrert was cultivated with wheat (Triticum durum), with applications of nitrogen fertilizer, urea, at doses of 0, 200 and 400 kg ha-1. Organic carbon was measured by Walkley & Black method. Soil samples were incubated and CO2 emanated from the treatments was measured after 4, 22, 46 and 142 hours of incubation. Nitrogen mineralization (NO3-) during the crop cycle was obtained from KCl extraction and Kjeldhal method. The tendency was described by a lineal function (y = ax + b), a statistical means trial test was carried out (Tukey a=0.05). Organic carbon values were between 0.87 to 1.02%, not much difference was found at different doses. The emission of CO2 was 194, 247 and 238 mg/g/h for doses 0, 200 and 400 Kg N ha-1 respectively, and there was not much significant difference (p>0.05). The magnitude of the nitrogen mineralization was 753, 942 and 1125 mg N for doses 0, 200 and 400 Kg N ha-1 respectively, with differences (p>0.05) between them. Highest doses of nitrogen applied to the soil does not necessarily correspond to a higher emission of CO2 or organic carbon, but increase (p<0.05) the nitrogen mineralization, at least under evaluated conditions.